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#Psalmtweets weeks 2 and 3

I have been reading a psalm a day and tweeting something inspired by the psalm. There are other psalmtweeters involved in this challenge. As I read the psalms I look at the structure of the psalm. There are often three or more sections. The psalmist may begin with a complaint or a petition for God’s help, discuss the state of the world or how he is beset by enemies, and then move on to praise of God’s character. Character and name are used almost interchangeably. The hashtag #Psalmtweets is used in each tweet.

I added one of my recent photos to Psalm 8’s tweet.

Thistledown

Thistledown

Ps. 8: All creation reminds David of the glory of God. People seem insignificant by comparison, yet God cares for us.

Ps. 9: Praising God involves telling Him and others of God’s character and what He has done. Enemies are defeated.

Ps. 10: God seems far away to David, looking at the state of humanity. He remembers God’s sovereignty and character.

Ps.11: Refuge, holiness, sovereignty, righteousness and justice are attributes of the God upright people will meet.

Ps. 12: David complains about wicked people. God promises to protect the needy. David respects God’s words, which are pure.

Ps.13: ‘How long?’ is followed by trust in God’s unfailing love and salvation – songs of thanks and praise

Ps.14: David asks God to put the world to rights. He asks that his people will be thankful for God’s salvation (power to save)

Ps. 15: David sets out some guidelines for life in the presence of God.

Ps.16: Safety, refuge, joy and gladness on the path to eternal life with God.

Ps.17: David prays for God to defeat David’s enemies. He knows he is loved and blessed by God.

Ps. 18: A psalm of thanksgiving and celebration of David’s relationship with God his Rock and Saviour.

Ps. 19: Praise for the Creator and his Word (law). A prayer often used by preachers.

Ps. 20: A prayer for the Lord’s blessing. Then assurance of his trustworthiness. A plea for salvation.

Ps. 21: A psalm of praise and thanksgiving for God’s strength. Evil people will be destroyed when God appears.

So far all the psalms have been attributed to David, who was a shepherd boy, a musician and became King.

This project was the idea of @PsalterMark

I have provided a link to Psalm 8. The other psalms may be found on the Bible Gateway website either by searching or by navigating from Psalm 8.

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Tweeting about the Psalms – The first week

I have been following PsalterMark on Twitter for some time. He regularly uses the #Psalmtweets hashtag.  A few weeks ago he invited other people to join him in reading a Psalm a day and using the hashtag. We began tweeting on Sunday 27th August. (I have to admit I am reading a few days ahead and scheduling my Tweets in advance!)

For this project so far, I have been reading each Psalm and looking at its form, what we learn about the psalmist, what he teaches about God and what his concerns are. The psalms include some very honest writing, complaints, misery – no putting on a brave face, facing up to reality instead.

I thought it might be helpful (if only to me) to collect my Tweets together and provide links to the appropriate Psalms.

Psalm 1: There are blessings from seeking to know God’s ways of doing things – fruitfulness and protection. #Psalmtweets

I also posted a photo, but forgot the hashtag.

A tree planted by water

A tree planted by water

Ps. 2: Kings & rulers should be wise & serve God with fear, rejoice with trembling. Blessing for those whose refuge is God.

Ps. 3: King David tells himself his enemies tell lies – God answers prayer and sustains. David prays a blessing on the people.

Ps. 4: David speaks to God, then the people then God. His distress changes to joy, trust and peace.

Ps. 5: God listens, is merciful & righteous. David compares the wicked and the righteous. He prays honestly in the morning

Ps. 6: A prayer for mercy and deliverance. David has assurance that God has heard and will act.

Ps. 7: David would have understood “if you’re in a hole, stop digging”. Praise God instead.

While the book of Psalms is sometimes called the Psalms of David, he is not believed to be the author of all the psalms. So far in my reading all the Psalms have been attributed to David by the translators of the New International Version. Although he was not perfect and made many mistakes he is described as being a man after God’s heart. I know there is much I can learn from David in his attitude to God, to life and to prayer.

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A Twitter project

Regular readers of this blog will know that I find it difficult to resist a challenge. Another Blogging from A to Z in April participant issued one on Twitter and his blog.

I intend to continue with my posts about books and any craft projects I find time to complete.

The challenge is to Tweet daily about the Psalms beginning with Psalm 1 on Sunday 27 August 2017.

As I attempt to read from the Psalms every day as part of my quiet time, I have agreed to take part in the #psalmtweets project. I have been reading through the psalms in order for the last six years or so. Although I have no qualifications in Theology or Bible study, I have used various study guides over the years. I also believe that the words of the Bible may speak to anyone reading them through the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

In the past I have sometimes lingered over the same Psalm for several days, particularly Psalm 119, which has a section for each letter of the Hebrew alphabet. This project does not allow for that; it is a psalm a day (not to be confused with a psalmody!)

There may be supplementary posts on this blog as the project progresses. I am not committing myself to any regular blogging. What appears here may be as much a surprise to me as it is to you.

Thank you for reading. If you wish to read all the Tweets from the handful of Twitter people, who have given advance notice that they are responding to this challenge, use the #psalmtweets hashtag to search Twitter.