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#Psalmtweets weeks 12 and 13

During this time the character limit on Twitter was doubled from 120 to 240 characters. My daily tweets about a psalm have increased in length a little and it is no longer necessary to use contractions with ampersands and missing spaces. Perhaps it has made me lazy!

There are 3 pictures from Images of Grace by Jacqui Grace, which I have coloured.

Ps. 78: Asaph reminds the people of God’s dealings with their ancestors who rebelled. Also how he chose David from the tribe of Judah.

Ps. 79: Asaph prays that God will show his power against those who have destroyed the temple and city so that his people will praise God.

Ps.80: Asaph likens his nation to a cultivated vine. He asks God to hear, restore and to make His face shine upon them and save them.

Ps. 81: Asaph begins with a call to praise. A warning from God about not having other gods and a promise if they listen to God and follow him.

Ps. 82: Asaph speaks of God’s judging of unjust rulers, of underdogs who need help and protection. He asks God to judge the earth and all the nations.

Ps. 83: Asaph asks God to act against the nations conspiring against God. Blow them away like chaff or thistledown. Let them know that you are Lord.

Ps. 84: The sons of Korah sing about God’s dwelling place. Those who live with God, who trust in God and whose strength is in God are blessed.

Psalm 84

Psalm 84

 

Ps. 85: The sons of Korah pray to God about their land and people. They move from complaint, to listening to God and end with hope. A way to pray!

 

Ps. 86: David recognises his need of the forgiving God. He praises him, requests an undivided heart. (Book title by @LucyMillsBooks) He desires to go on learning God’s way to live and that his enemies should notice God’s goodness. #psalmtweets @JustCardsDirect

 

Psalm 86

Psalm 86

Ps. 87:The sons of Korah sing about Zion, the city of God, about other nations – those which acknowledge God are adopted as if they were born in Zion.

Ps. 88: This Psalm begins with a statement of faith, but goes on to list Heman the Ezrahite’s troubles and feelings of abandonment.

 

Ps. 89: Ethan the Ezrahite ends Book 3 with praise to God for who He is and what He does, His covenant with David. (Who is the rejected anointed one? Saul?) ends with praise

 

Psalm 92

Psalm 92

Ps. 90: Moses prays about God’s faithfulness, human mortality and sinfulness. He asks for wisdom to live well and to have God’s blessing on ‘the work of our hands’.

 

Ps. 91: A psalm of promises. God’s protection, faithfulness, guardian angels,deliverance, long life and salvation

 

Ps. 92: Praise and music proclaim God’s love and faithfulness. God’s enemies will perish, but the righteous continue to bear fruit in old age.

 

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#Psalmtweets weeks 4 and 5

Since 27 August I have been participating in a Twitter project to Tweet daily about the Psalms in canonical order – the order in which they appear in the Old Testament.

The next fourteen Psalms are attributed to David. It is interesting that the Psalms are not arranged in chronological order.

Where I had coloured a page or a postcard from the Images of Grace by Jacqui Grace published by Just Cards Direct, I have added a photo to the tweet.

Ps. 22: A prophetic psalm which speaks about Jesus Christ & events around his crucifixion & his kingship.

Ps. 23: Perhaps the best known of all the psalms. God takes care of us always.

Psalm 23 verses 2-3

Psalm 23 verses 2-3

Ps. 24: God created and owns the earth. How to approach him and letting in the King of Glory are themes

Ps. 25: David turns to God for instruction, guidance, deliverance, forgiveness, protection and redemption.

Ps. 26: David compares his life (trusting God) to the scheming of wicked people and praises God.

Ps. 27: God protects David (and us) from the fear of enemies. Praise and music result from life in God’s presence. Follow him!

Psalm 27 Verse 1

Psalm 27 Verse 1

Ps. 28: Plea for God to hear&be merciful to David, to punish the wicked. Song of praise for God’s answer&empowering protection

Ps. 29: An exhortation to ascribe glory&strength to God.The nature of his voice described. He is the source of strength&peace.

Psalm 30 Verse 4

Psalm 30 Verse 4

Ps. 30: Healing&mercy,anger&favour are God’s. David’s despair&wailing become joy, dancing, song thanksgiving.

Ps. 31: Verse 5 written by David was spoken by Jesus Christ and St Stephen the first Christian martyr as they died

Ps 32: Forgiveness & freedom from guilt are blessings from God to those who confess their wrongdoing. Rejoice!

Ps. 33: A song of praise to God the all-seeing creator. His unfailing love is our hope.

Ps. 34: Another prophetic psalm. None of Jesus Christ’s bones were broken, unlike those of others crucified.

Ps. 35: David asks God to fight his battles for him. He prays for (and against) his enemies. Praise and thanksgiving to God

With the character limit on Twitter, some of the Tweets are rather compressed. Other participants’ contributions to the project may be found using the #Psalmtweets hashtag on Twitter. (Or simply click on the link in the previous sentence!)

#Psalmtweets weeks 2 and 3

I have been reading a psalm a day and tweeting something inspired by the psalm. There are other psalmtweeters involved in this challenge. As I read the psalms I look at the structure of the psalm. There are often three or more sections. The psalmist may begin with a complaint or a petition for God’s help, discuss the state of the world or how he is beset by enemies, and then move on to praise of God’s character. Character and name are used almost interchangeably. The hashtag #Psalmtweets is used in each tweet.

I added one of my recent photos to Psalm 8’s tweet.

Thistledown

Thistledown

Ps. 8: All creation reminds David of the glory of God. People seem insignificant by comparison, yet God cares for us.

Ps. 9: Praising God involves telling Him and others of God’s character and what He has done. Enemies are defeated.

Ps. 10: God seems far away to David, looking at the state of humanity. He remembers God’s sovereignty and character.

Ps.11: Refuge, holiness, sovereignty, righteousness and justice are attributes of the God upright people will meet.

Ps. 12: David complains about wicked people. God promises to protect the needy. David respects God’s words, which are pure.

Ps.13: ‘How long?’ is followed by trust in God’s unfailing love and salvation – songs of thanks and praise

Ps.14: David asks God to put the world to rights. He asks that his people will be thankful for God’s salvation (power to save)

Ps. 15: David sets out some guidelines for life in the presence of God.

Ps.16: Safety, refuge, joy and gladness on the path to eternal life with God.

Ps.17: David prays for God to defeat David’s enemies. He knows he is loved and blessed by God.

Ps. 18: A psalm of thanksgiving and celebration of David’s relationship with God his Rock and Saviour.

Ps. 19: Praise for the Creator and his Word (law). A prayer often used by preachers.

Ps. 20: A prayer for the Lord’s blessing. Then assurance of his trustworthiness. A plea for salvation.

Ps. 21: A psalm of praise and thanksgiving for God’s strength. Evil people will be destroyed when God appears.

So far all the psalms have been attributed to David, who was a shepherd boy, a musician and became King.

This project was the idea of @PsalterMark

I have provided a link to Psalm 8. The other psalms may be found on the Bible Gateway website either by searching or by navigating from Psalm 8.