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Idyll paint chip poem

Sea foam on a bridge and beck

Sea foam in the foreground with distant arable fields

This week Linda Kruschke’s challenge is to write an Idyll. For the dictionary definitions, colours and her poem please click here. She writes:

Today your challenge is to write your own idyll, according to any of the three definitions provided by the poetry dictionary

The paint chip words and phrases you have to work with are sprig of mintmoon walkwaterfallscarecrowsea foamsaffron, and forget-me-not. I’d like you to use at least five of these words and phrases in your idyll.

 

 

Coastal countryside

In the northern British countryside scarecrows are rarely seen.
Mostly made for festivals or National Trust properties,
They have been given funny names* or represent celebrities.
The windswept arable fields change from ploughed brown to green.

Along the edge of the growing crop wild flowers germinate.
They look quite small and insignificant by the swaying stalks;
Field pansy, forget-me-not, shepherd’s purse and more brighten our walks.
After a storm sea foam leaves the coast in a strange state.

Sea foam glistening white clings to the cliffs as the tide ebbs.
Seen from afar it might be thought to be a waterfall.
Red saffron-coloured sandstone makes many an attractive wall.
On the walls plants grow, snails shelter and spiders build webs.

* I once met a blogging scarecrow with a funny name at Wordsworth’s House and Garden in Cockermouth. Read about our first meeting here.