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A paint chip poem

This week’s challenge from Linda Kruschke is, ‘What is a paint chip poem?’ Do visit her blog to see the colours, her poem and other responses to this challenge.

‘My challenge to you is to write a poem that conveys an experience or an emotion, or that is simply your beautiful arrangement of words to convey whatever you like. You can either pick one word and flesh out what it inspires in you, or use at least five of the seven paint chip words offered today. Bonus points for using all seven.

The paint chips I picked today are pearly gates, habanero, mud, pins and needles, breezy, quicksand, and indigo.

It’s an odd selection, I admit, and few seem to go together. Although I can certainly see mud and quicksand showing up in the same poem.’


Nefarious connections

Sensations caused by habanero, mud
And quicksand are various.
Digestion may be breezy; toes with
Pins and needles tingle – hilarious
Thoughts, then dark mood indigo
As pearly gate entry is never vicarious.

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Juxtaposed paint chips

How to be Well-versed in Poetry

How to be Well-versed in Poetry

Linda Kruschke has reached the letter J in John Drury’s Poetry dictionary. There was only one entry, leaving a problem for the second time through! My go-to poetry reference book is How to be well-versed in poetry edited by E.O. Parrott.

Linda writes:

This week I’m only giving you six paint chips to work with. If you’d like, you can juxtapose each of these pairs. Or you could mix them up. Or maybe you want to pick your favorites and juxtapose them with ideas from your own imagination.

The words and phrases you have to work with, listed as I’ve paired them, are bougainvillea and fountain of youthblue ribbon and panther, and lightning and lighthouse. You only need to use two, but extra bonus points if you use them all.

Juxtaposed paint chips and text books

Plants like bougainvillea regenerate,
Needing no fountain of youth.
Loitering youths in the park
May be shockingly uncouth.

A blue ribbon is not strong enough to hold
Back a panther on the prowl.
Better to form a rosette –
Panthers roar and hiss and growl!

On a stormy night sailors watch the lightning.
The forked flashes are quite random.
Unlike the regular light-
House beams. Strikes happen seldom.

Juxtaposition was John Drury’s J choice,
E. O. Parrott’s J’s Jingle.
Both authors agree on this –
Entry for J is single.

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Idyll paint chip poem

Sea foam on a bridge and beck

Sea foam in the foreground with distant arable fields

This week Linda Kruschke’s challenge is to write an Idyll. For the dictionary definitions, colours and her poem please click here. She writes:

Today your challenge is to write your own idyll, according to any of the three definitions provided by the poetry dictionary

The paint chip words and phrases you have to work with are sprig of mintmoon walkwaterfallscarecrowsea foamsaffron, and forget-me-not. I’d like you to use at least five of these words and phrases in your idyll.

 

 

Coastal countryside

In the northern British countryside scarecrows are rarely seen.
Mostly made for festivals or National Trust properties,
They have been given funny names* or represent celebrities.
The windswept arable fields change from ploughed brown to green.

Along the edge of the growing crop wild flowers germinate.
They look quite small and insignificant by the swaying stalks;
Field pansy, forget-me-not, shepherd’s purse and more brighten our walks.
After a storm sea foam leaves the coast in a strange state.

Sea foam glistening white clings to the cliffs as the tide ebbs.
Seen from afar it might be thought to be a waterfall.
Red saffron-coloured sandstone makes many an attractive wall.
On the walls plants grow, snails shelter and spiders build webs.

* I once met a blogging scarecrow with a funny name at Wordsworth’s House and Garden in Cockermouth. Read about our first meeting here.