7

A topical poem

My social life at present is enhanced by the online groups I have joined. One of these is a poetry group, which meets once a month. There is an optional challenge to write a poem on a theme. The poems are read aloud at the next meeting.

The theme for our March meeting, which falls in the Christian season of Lent, is wilderness. Earlier this week I wrote a poem, which I am sharing with you here. My prayer is that the prophecy in Isaiah 2:4 would soon be fulfilled.

The War in Ukraine

Making a wilderness,
Burning and destroying,
Polluting, disrupting,
Soldiers deploying.

Some people are fleeing,
Their settled lives over.
Women and children – how
Will they recover?

Men and youths (all ages)
Bear unfamiliar arms.
An unprovoked foe can
Cause such alarms.

Homes deserted, folk
Shelter beneath the ground.
Noise, dust, black smoke and fumes –
Where can peace be found?

Around the world people pray
In bewilderedness
For a quick, peaceful end
To war-caused wilderness.

The post linked to on the word Lent mentions wilderness as well as Lent. It is one of my posts for the Blogging from A to in April Challenge 2020. I have found that taking part in The Blogging from A to Z Challenge has helped me connect with bloggers in other countries (and continents). Information about the dates for the 2022 Blogging from A to Z in April Challenge may be found here. The theme reveal is later this month.

Another blogger who has written about Lent and Wilderness is Malcolm Guite, an accomplished poet.

3

What I am writing in November

November is a month when there are traditionally lots of online writing challenges. Once I took part in Blog Every Day in November. This year I have signed up to NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), not to write a novel, but to carry on writing my childhood memories, which I started many years ago. I shared some episodes here on Sue’s Trifles back in 2013.

At the end of October Linda Kruschke announced that she will not be setting any more Paint Chip Poetry challenges. It has been fun and has taught me a lot. My Paint Chip Poetry page will not be updated again. I need to change my pinned tweet, which has been a link to that page for some time.

Sue’s Words and Pictures is still a participant in Cee Neuner’s Midweek Madness Challenge on Wednesdays.

I also take part in #WildflowerHour on Twitter. During the darker months I am unlikely to Tweet every week with flowering plants I spot. The challenge through the winter is to find 10 plants in flower each week. On Sunday I found 22 different species growing wild. I saw two others, which had been planted for educational purposes.

On Wednesdays I sometimes tweet with the hashtag #WildWebsWednesday to show how other organisms depend on plants.

The writing group I belong to is still meeting on Zoom. There is an assignment to write for that every two months.

I am still writing poetry. I have joined an online poetry group which meets once a month on Zoom. We are given a topic to write about between meetings.

I intend to post on Sue’s Trifles every Thursday.

If you are a writer, what are you writing?

If not, what are you reading?

4

Paint chip similes

This week Linda Kruschke has picked simile from the Poetry dictionary. Don’t forget to visit her blog for the paint chip colours, her poem and the links to others. why not try your own poem.

Georgina Tennant gives advice to non-poets on how to write poetry. Her poem about bereavement is poignant though.

Your challenge, dear poets, is to write a poem using simile. Sounds easy, I know. But here’s the catch: for every simile in your poem, one of the paint chip words or phrases must be on one side of the linking word. That means the number of similes in your poem depends on how many of the paint chips you choose to color with. The paint chip words and phrases you have to choose from are bluebird, sweet ‘n’ sour, taxi, deep dark wood, vintage turquoise, ultraviolet, and sparkle.

I’m only requiring you to pick one, but as usual you can pick up some useless bonus points if you use them all. And a gold star if you can figure out how to put two of them on opposite sides of your simile linking word.

Linda Kruschke

I found this challenge difficult, perhaps because I was tired when I tried it.

Danger signs

Wasps, like London and New York taxis
Cut up and reassembled, nest
On the edge of the deep dark wood
As threatening as night sounds, which test
The nerves of anyone who could
Be old enough to have worn minis and maxis.

How do you read this? What is threatening?

If you are interested in wasps’ nests I have photos of some on my other blog, Sue’s words and pictures.