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Trust

It is over six months since I decided on my word for the year. In 2016 my word was Rest, but I ended the year very tired!

This year my word is Trust. I wrote about my reasons for choosing this word in an earlier post.

It didn’t take me long to realise that I find it very difficult to trust God. Although I am familiar with the promises set out in the Bible and the stories of God’s faithfulness, I find it hard to believe that God is working his purpose out and knows what is best for us.

Reasons to trust God

Reasons to trust God

There are many bad things happening, according to the news media. The good things are not reported. We begin to have a skewed outlook on life, when we only think about the news (which is available to us 24 hours a day). We need to look around us and notice the acts of kindness, the people working on behalf of others, the beauty of creation. We need to go on reading about the way God has worked in the lives of other people, not just in the Bible, but through the ages and in our own time.

If I say I trust God, but expect things to go wrong (a tendency I have), what does that say about my trust in God?

Recognising a fault in ourselves is the first step towards overcoming it. As I write this, I keep remembering words from the Anglican baptism service. The parents and godparents (or the candidate if he/she is old enough) are asked, “Do you believe in God?”

The question is asked three times – once each for each person of the Trinity.

Each time the response is, “I believe and trust in him.”

Thus a distinction is made between belief and trust. Trust is action based on belief.

Another phrase from the baptism service is, “With the help of God we will.”

Trusting God involves accepting that we need his help and that it is available to us at all times and in all places. He is ready to guide us and strengthen us, if we turn to him.

Each day we face choices. How do we spend our time?  How do we deal with situations as they arise? How do we interact with the people around us? How do we react to news? By turning to God and trusting him for strength and guidance, we are able to experience his peace.

We may find that we are able to refuse to do something that we might have done from a sense of obligation in order to rest. We may find we are able to do something we had not planned, because an opportunity arose. Perhaps others see us as less predictable if we are acting out our trust in God.

One exciting thing that happened recently was that I was able to take up a cancellation on a writing weekend, which had been fully booked for months. I don’t know who dropped out at the last minute, but I enquired about space and was able to go. While it is not always a good idea to leave bookings until the last minute, in this case it worked well. I didn’t worry about whether I’d be able to go as I only knew two days beforehand that I could.

I shall try to remember that this year I am concentrating on putting my trust in God.

 

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What I read in May 2017

I read five books in May 2017. One has been discussed at length already. Please excuse the white space in this post and scroll down to find out about the other four books. I am aiming to spend less time blogging in future. Formatting a post takes time I could spend away from my computer!

The Fiddler’s Leg by Ann Lingard

The Fiddler’s Leg
The task set for the Writing group I belong to was to read a book by a Cumbrian author. I found this book by a resident of the county in a second-hand book sale. It didn’t really count as she had written it before moving/relocating to Cumbria! I enjoyed it all the same especially as there is an overlap in the interests of the characters between science and the arts.

Tarka the Otter by Henry Williamson has had a post all to itself.

The Land of Green Ginger by Winifred Holtby was another book I found among the second-hand books. The title reminded me of a children’s book by Noel Langley, but this is very different. The setting is around the time of the World War I and the characters are interesting and credible. Some of the events are traumatic, but the ending is hopeful.

Tails I lose by Justyn Rees Larcombe is the true life story of a promising young man (the author) who became addicted to online gambling and lost everything. He had grown up in a Christian family, but drifted away from the Church and his faith. After successful careers in the army and then in civilian life, he found that his life was in tatters. The path to his recovery and how he now helps others with similar addictive behaviour is described in this fast-paced, readable book. I bought it in a  bookshop.

Stormbringers by Philippa Gregory is the second in a series. It is another second-hand book, this time a hardback with a good sized print and line drawings at the start of each chapter. I enjoyed reading it but found the ending rather dark. The series title should have prepared me though: Order of Darkness.