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#Psalmtweets weeks 2 and 3

I have been reading a psalm a day and tweeting something inspired by the psalm. There are other psalmtweeters involved in this challenge. As I read the psalms I look at the structure of the psalm. There are often three or more sections. The psalmist may begin with a complaint or a petition for God’s help, discuss the state of the world or how he is beset by enemies, and then move on to praise of God’s character. Character and name are used almost interchangeably. The hashtag #Psalmtweets is used in each tweet.

I added one of my recent photos to Psalm 8’s tweet.

Thistledown

Thistledown

Ps. 8: All creation reminds David of the glory of God. People seem insignificant by comparison, yet God cares for us.

Ps. 9: Praising God involves telling Him and others of God’s character and what He has done. Enemies are defeated.

Ps. 10: God seems far away to David, looking at the state of humanity. He remembers God’s sovereignty and character.

Ps.11: Refuge, holiness, sovereignty, righteousness and justice are attributes of the God upright people will meet.

Ps. 12: David complains about wicked people. God promises to protect the needy. David respects God’s words, which are pure.

Ps.13: ‘How long?’ is followed by trust in God’s unfailing love and salvation – songs of thanks and praise

Ps.14: David asks God to put the world to rights. He asks that his people will be thankful for God’s salvation (power to save)

Ps. 15: David sets out some guidelines for life in the presence of God.

Ps.16: Safety, refuge, joy and gladness on the path to eternal life with God.

Ps.17: David prays for God to defeat David’s enemies. He knows he is loved and blessed by God.

Ps. 18: A psalm of thanksgiving and celebration of David’s relationship with God his Rock and Saviour.

Ps. 19: Praise for the Creator and his Word (law). A prayer often used by preachers.

Ps. 20: A prayer for the Lord’s blessing. Then assurance of his trustworthiness. A plea for salvation.

Ps. 21: A psalm of praise and thanksgiving for God’s strength. Evil people will be destroyed when God appears.

So far all the psalms have been attributed to David, who was a shepherd boy, a musician and became King.

This project was the idea of @PsalterMark

I have provided a link to Psalm 8. The other psalms may be found on the Bible Gateway website either by searching or by navigating from Psalm 8.

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Tweeting about the Psalms – The first week

I have been following PsalterMark on Twitter for some time. He regularly uses the #Psalmtweets hashtag.  A few weeks ago he invited other people to join him in reading a Psalm a day and using the hashtag. We began tweeting on Sunday 27th August. (I have to admit I am reading a few days ahead and scheduling my Tweets in advance!)

For this project so far, I have been reading each Psalm and looking at its form, what we learn about the psalmist, what he teaches about God and what his concerns are. The psalms include some very honest writing, complaints, misery – no putting on a brave face, facing up to reality instead.

I thought it might be helpful (if only to me) to collect my Tweets together and provide links to the appropriate Psalms.

Psalm 1: There are blessings from seeking to know God’s ways of doing things – fruitfulness and protection. #Psalmtweets

I also posted a photo, but forgot the hashtag.

A tree planted by water

A tree planted by water

Ps. 2: Kings & rulers should be wise & serve God with fear, rejoice with trembling. Blessing for those whose refuge is God.

Ps. 3: King David tells himself his enemies tell lies – God answers prayer and sustains. David prays a blessing on the people.

Ps. 4: David speaks to God, then the people then God. His distress changes to joy, trust and peace.

Ps. 5: God listens, is merciful & righteous. David compares the wicked and the righteous. He prays honestly in the morning

Ps. 6: A prayer for mercy and deliverance. David has assurance that God has heard and will act.

Ps. 7: David would have understood “if you’re in a hole, stop digging”. Praise God instead.

While the book of Psalms is sometimes called the Psalms of David, he is not believed to be the author of all the psalms. So far in my reading all the Psalms have been attributed to David by the translators of the New International Version. Although he was not perfect and made many mistakes he is described as being a man after God’s heart. I know there is much I can learn from David in his attitude to God, to life and to prayer.

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A baby’s dress

I decided earlier this year that I needed to do some knitting without the pressure to finish it by a particular date. I bought some lemon baby DK acrylic yarn. Then I looked through my patterns. I realised I needed another 100 gram ball. The dye lot I had originally purchased had all gone, but I think it would be difficult to spot where I changed from one batch to the next.

The pattern, which had grabbed my attention, was the one I wrote about in a previous post – Peter Gregory designs for knitting 685.

I finished the coat I mentioned there and sent it to its intended recipient without blogging about it. Here is a photo of it.

Baby's coat in white

Baby’s coat in white

This time I decided to knit the whole set – coat, dress, bonnet and bootees. No-one was lined up to receive it. I thought I would do it for charity. That is still my intention. It is complete apart from the ribbon for the bootees, which I have not yet managed to purchase from a real (as opposed to on-line) shop. I have an idea how to use it as a charity project without adding any more to its carbon footprint. An acquaintance is expecting a granddaughter. If she would like to purchase it with the money going to a church hall restoration project, that would be ideal. I shall keep it until the baby has arrived and then see what she thinks.

I am posting a picture of the dress, which fastens at the back with press-studs (snap fasteners). The yarn I substituted this time is Baby Care DK by Woolcraft.

Baby's dress in lemon

Baby’s dress in lemon