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#Psalmtweets weeks 6 and 7

This is the next post in my series about the Twitter project I am taking part in.

The Psalms constitute a book of the Bible or more specifically the Old Testament. The Book of Psalms itself is divided into books. This post includes tweets for the end of Book 1 and the beginning of Book 2. In my New International Version (NIV) all the Psalms in book 1 are attributed to David.

Ps. 36: David begins with the wicked, praises God’s love&nature, prays for the upright himself, predicts enemies’ downfall 1/2

Ps. 36: It is easy to be like the evildoers David describes, unaware of own wrongdoing. #Psalmtweets 2/2

Ps.37: A psalm full of advice. Do not fret Trust God Do good Take refuge in God the deliverer

Ps. 38: David describes feelings of guilt and separation from God and friends. He asks God to save him.

Ps. 39: David’s silence increased his anguish. How long would he live? Emptiness. He hopes in the God, who teaches and saves

Ps. 40: The God of miracles deserves obedience. Those he saves from sin should worship him.

Ps. 41: Those who look after people in need are blessed. David’s enemies slander him. God helps David. Praise Him!

Book 2

King David’s fame was foretold in the Bible. But who was Korah? Are his sons more important than him? They were singers.

Book 2 includes various attributions – the sons of Korah, Asaph, David and Solomon.

The sons of Korah were singers. My research leads me to suppose that the Korah they were descended from (not necessarily their father) was the one who rebelled against Moses. Numbers 16. He died, but his children were spared. Asaph was a leader of David’s choir. 1 Chronicles 6:39

Ps. 42: The sons of Korah look to nature for images of their relationship with God he lifts the spirits of those hoping in him

Ps. 43: The psalmist speaks to God and to his own soul.Hoping in God leads to praise for salvation.

Ps. 44: When times are hard, like the psalmist we can look back on what God has done and ask him to act

Ps. 45: The king is praised, a prayer to God with his everlasting throne, advice to the bride of the king both promised renown

Ps. 46: a well-known psalm of faith in God who can bring disaster and peace. He is with us in our troubles.

Psalm 46 from Images of Grace

Psalm 46 from Images of Grace

Ps. 47: God is king of all the nations – not just of the people of Israel. He is greater than that and to be highly praised.

Ps. 48: In praise of the city of God, where He is present and will guide his people for ever.

Ps. 49: Advice to everyone against trusting in wealth. All die, but the psalmist trusts God to redeem him and keep him close.

 

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#Psalmtweets weeks 4 and 5

Since 27 August I have been participating in a Twitter project to Tweet daily about the Psalms in canonical order – the order in which they appear in the Old Testament.

The next fourteen Psalms are attributed to David. It is interesting that the Psalms are not arranged in chronological order.

Where I had coloured a page or a postcard from the Images of Grace by Jacqui Grace published by Just Cards Direct, I have added a photo to the tweet.

Ps. 22: A prophetic psalm which speaks about Jesus Christ & events around his crucifixion & his kingship.

Ps. 23: Perhaps the best known of all the psalms. God takes care of us always.

Psalm 23 verses 2-3

Psalm 23 verses 2-3

Ps. 24: God created and owns the earth. How to approach him and letting in the King of Glory are themes

Ps. 25: David turns to God for instruction, guidance, deliverance, forgiveness, protection and redemption.

Ps. 26: David compares his life (trusting God) to the scheming of wicked people and praises God.

Ps. 27: God protects David (and us) from the fear of enemies. Praise and music result from life in God’s presence. Follow him!

Psalm 27 Verse 1

Psalm 27 Verse 1

Ps. 28: Plea for God to hear&be merciful to David, to punish the wicked. Song of praise for God’s answer&empowering protection

Ps. 29: An exhortation to ascribe glory&strength to God.The nature of his voice described. He is the source of strength&peace.

Psalm 30 Verse 4

Psalm 30 Verse 4

Ps. 30: Healing&mercy,anger&favour are God’s. David’s despair&wailing become joy, dancing, song thanksgiving.

Ps. 31: Verse 5 written by David was spoken by Jesus Christ and St Stephen the first Christian martyr as they died

Ps 32: Forgiveness & freedom from guilt are blessings from God to those who confess their wrongdoing. Rejoice!

Ps. 33: A song of praise to God the all-seeing creator. His unfailing love is our hope.

Ps. 34: Another prophetic psalm. None of Jesus Christ’s bones were broken, unlike those of others crucified.

Ps. 35: David asks God to fight his battles for him. He prays for (and against) his enemies. Praise and thanksgiving to God

With the character limit on Twitter, some of the Tweets are rather compressed. Other participants’ contributions to the project may be found using the #Psalmtweets hashtag on Twitter. (Or simply click on the link in the previous sentence!)

4

Trust

It is over six months since I decided on my word for the year. In 2016 my word was Rest, but I ended the year very tired!

This year my word is Trust. I wrote about my reasons for choosing this word in an earlier post.

It didn’t take me long to realise that I find it very difficult to trust God. Although I am familiar with the promises set out in the Bible and the stories of God’s faithfulness, I find it hard to believe that God is working his purpose out and knows what is best for us.

Reasons to trust God

Reasons to trust God

There are many bad things happening, according to the news media. The good things are not reported. We begin to have a skewed outlook on life, when we only think about the news (which is available to us 24 hours a day). We need to look around us and notice the acts of kindness, the people working on behalf of others, the beauty of creation. We need to go on reading about the way God has worked in the lives of other people, not just in the Bible, but through the ages and in our own time.

If I say I trust God, but expect things to go wrong (a tendency I have), what does that say about my trust in God?

Recognising a fault in ourselves is the first step towards overcoming it. As I write this, I keep remembering words from the Anglican baptism service. The parents and godparents (or the candidate if he/she is old enough) are asked, “Do you believe in God?”

The question is asked three times – once each for each person of the Trinity.

Each time the response is, “I believe and trust in him.”

Thus a distinction is made between belief and trust. Trust is action based on belief.

Another phrase from the baptism service is, “With the help of God we will.”

Trusting God involves accepting that we need his help and that it is available to us at all times and in all places. He is ready to guide us and strengthen us, if we turn to him.

Each day we face choices. How do we spend our time?  How do we deal with situations as they arise? How do we interact with the people around us? How do we react to news? By turning to God and trusting him for strength and guidance, we are able to experience his peace.

We may find that we are able to refuse to do something that we might have done from a sense of obligation in order to rest. We may find we are able to do something we had not planned, because an opportunity arose. Perhaps others see us as less predictable if we are acting out our trust in God.

One exciting thing that happened recently was that I was able to take up a cancellation on a writing weekend, which had been fully booked for months. I don’t know who dropped out at the last minute, but I enquired about space and was able to go. While it is not always a good idea to leave bookings until the last minute, in this case it worked well. I didn’t worry about whether I’d be able to go as I only knew two days beforehand that I could.

I shall try to remember that this year I am concentrating on putting my trust in God.