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Paint chip monostich

This week’s prompt from Linda Kruschke is for a monostich – a single line of poetry. The full definition and the paint chip colours as well as her monotich and the responses of others may be found on her blog. Why not have a go?

Linda writes:

My challenge to you today is to write a poem using monostich. You could try writing a poem that is a single line in its entirety, or use monostich interspersed throughout a longer poem. I actually hope that someone tries the joke option mentioned in Drury’s definition. I’m not clever enough for that, but I’m sure one of you is.

The paint chip words and phrases you have to work with are the red planetlily of the valleydust devilfossilgreen flashschool bus, and inchworm.

I would like you to incorporate one or two of these words and phrases into your monostich, if you decide to write just a one-line poem. If you write a longer poem, with monostich throughout or at the beginning or end, then I would like you to use at least four of the words and phrases, with at least one in a monostich.

Is there life on Mars?

Does lily of the valley grow on the red planet?
It might look like a green flash surrounded by granite.

A fossil of an inchworm would be proof positive, innit?

(Although I grew up south of the Thames, I can’t remember using ‘innit’ before! It’s a local version of ‘isn’t it?’.)

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Quintilla paint chip challenge

This week’s Paint chip challenge from Linda Krushcke is for quintillas. Do visit her blog to see the the definition of quintilla, the colours and her poem for this challenge.

She writes:

‘Today we’ll be writing one or more quintillas.

‘Your challenge is to write at least one stanza in the quintilla form. You can certainly write more if you like, but one well-crafted quintilla is all I’m asking.

‘I was inspired by the requirement of five lines to only give you five paint chip words and phrases to work with.

‘Those words and phrases are robin’s egg, jade, The Scarlet Letter, slow, and goldfish. I would like you to use at least two of these in your quintilla. If you can use them as your rhyme words, all the better. But you could also pick one to be your title but not use it in the actual poem. The possibilities aren’t endless, but there are more than a few.’

One of these paint chips resonated with me this week. Incidentally, the robin we see in the UK is completely different from the American one.

Slow process

A picture I saw on Twitter
Showed some robin’s eggs in a nest
In a hiking boot, but I guessed
That boot’s owner was not sitter-
In-chief. Birds incubate eggs best.

Please click on the link below to see the original tweet, which inspired this poem.

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Metonymy paint chip poetry

Lynda Kruschke writes:

My challenge is to write a poem, of any style, in which one or more of the paint chip words and phrases is used as a metonymy. You could write rhyming couplets or crazy free verse or a beautiful sonnet.

The paint chip words and phrases at your disposal are gauzesagebrushlooking glassrabbit holequicksilverPlymouth Rock, and mountain town.


While I appreciate that the challenge is to use one or more of these words and phrases as a metonym – representing something else, I was not inspired to construct a poem in that way. (Metonymy is the use of metonyms.)

I noticed that rabbit hole and looking glass are connected with Lewis Carroll’s Alice, who had adventures in Wonderland (accessed via a rabbit hole) and through the looking-glass. Lewis Carroll’s real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. He was a mathematician with a sense of fun.

My poem is just for fun rather than a serious attempt at using the prompt. If you haven’t read Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking-glass, I thoroughly recommend them. I saw a film of Through the looking-glass, which did not bear much resemblance to the book!

Failed metonymy

A mathematician named Charles
Wrote fiction appealing to girls.
His books about Alice
Were read in the Palace,
But Alice did not have curls.

The young girl mentioned above
Had a dream – the poor love.
Down a rabbit hole
Went this young soul.
A dodo was there not a dove.

In the next book Charles wrote
Alice’s looking-glass he smote.
Through she went to a land,
Where adventures were planned.
A story was told – take note!


As this post is scheduled for Easter Sunday I wish all my readers a Happy Easter. You are warmly invited to check out the rest of my blog and especially my posts for the Blogging from A to Z in April Challenge, which has just begun. (My earlier posts may also be found using the << at the bottom of the post.)