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Metonymy paint chip poetry

Lynda Kruschke writes:

My challenge is to write a poem, of any style, in which one or more of the paint chip words and phrases is used as a metonymy. You could write rhyming couplets or crazy free verse or a beautiful sonnet.

The paint chip words and phrases at your disposal are gauzesagebrushlooking glassrabbit holequicksilverPlymouth Rock, and mountain town.


While I appreciate that the challenge is to use one or more of these words and phrases as a metonym – representing something else, I was not inspired to construct a poem in that way. (Metonymy is the use of metonyms.)

I noticed that rabbit hole and looking glass are connected with Lewis Carroll’s Alice, who had adventures in Wonderland (accessed via a rabbit hole) and through the looking-glass. Lewis Carroll’s real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. He was a mathematician with a sense of fun.

My poem is just for fun rather than a serious attempt at using the prompt. If you haven’t read Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking-glass, I thoroughly recommend them. I saw a film of Through the looking-glass, which did not bear much resemblance to the book!

Failed metonymy

A mathematician named Charles
Wrote fiction appealing to girls.
His books about Alice
Were read in the Palace,
But Alice did not have curls.

The young girl mentioned above
Had a dream – the poor love.
Down a rabbit hole
Went this young soul.
A dodo was there not a dove.

In the next book Charles wrote
Alice’s looking-glass he smote.
Through she went to a land,
Where adventures were planned.
A story was told – take note!


As this post is scheduled for Easter Sunday I wish all my readers a Happy Easter. You are warmly invited to check out the rest of my blog and especially my posts for the Blogging from A to Z in April Challenge, which has just begun. (My earlier posts may also be found using the << at the bottom of the post.)

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Two e-books I read in February 2021

I found these two books on Borrowbox. They are both fiction intended to be read by adults.

Book coverThe Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd is a historical novel. It is described as a Regency romance novel. The genres it falls into include Christian Fiction although the Christian element is only shown in a few church services and the character of the eponymous heroine. During the industrial revolution people employed in cottage industries connected to the textile trade were likely to be put out of work by increasing mechanisation in the large textile mills. This novel is set in a precise historical time with soldiers returning from the war in Spain. It is a good story with lots of excitement and a theme of reconciliation. It left me wanting to learn more about the Luddites and the history of Yorkshire.

The Last Family in England by Matt Haig (Paperback ISBN 9781786893222) book coverThe Last Family in England by Matt Haig is described as comedy. To me it was more like tragedy or irony. I enjoyed it less than other books I have read by Matt Haig. The pet Labrador narrates the story of the family he is pledged to protect at all costs. He learns the truth about all the events, which occur  – some of them surprising. His interventions do some good, but at what personal (or rather doggy) cost? Humour is not universal. What makes one person laugh does not necessarily amuse another. It was an interesting, haunting story.

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Fable paint chip prompt

This week Linda Kruschke’s paint chip poetry prompt is particularly challenging.

Your challenge, if you’re up to it, is to write an original fable in verse. I’ll accept prose, if you must, but verse is so much more fun and challenging. In keeping with fable tradition, your poem should involve at least two animals and should illustrate a moral principle important to you. Maybe you want to show that lying is bad or that working industriously will yield good results.

The paint chip words and phrases that you have to work with for your fable are ghost, pins and needles, parchment, gauze, whirlpool, relish, and dawn. I’d like you to use at least four of the chips.

The Hole Story

A mouse, a stoat and a fox
Needed somewhere to live.
Said the fox, ‘A cardboard box
‘Would do for me. I don’t give
‘A fig for fine houses’.

The stoat would prefer a boat,
But the mouse wanted a house.
The stoat would stay afloat.
He doubted a whirlpool would douse
Any floating houses.

The three animals set out
Together on their quest.
From dawn they looked about
Searching their very best
For future houses.

The fox was first to be fixed –
A large cardboard box found
By the mouse in woodland (mixed)
Gave much space to run to ground
Far from fine houses.

The stoat and mouse continued
To search beside a stream.
Spiders’ webs of gauze imbued
The suspicion of a dream
Of finding houses.

The mouse spotted the boat first.
The stoat began to gloat.
‘It seems you have come off worst!’
He clambered in. ‘Off I float –
‘Boats are good houses!’

The mouse was left all alone,
‘Til a hedgehog came past.
Pins-and-Needles said, ‘Don’t moan!
‘Troubles hardly ever last.
‘Who needs fine houses?’

The poor mouse scurried back home.
He saw the boat capsized,
And the cardboard box home
Had collapsed. He realised
They weren’t fine houses.

Before they began their quest
All the animals resided
In holes in the ground. Guest
Suites were not provided
In lowly houses!

The hedgehog’s philosophy
That things should be relished
Helped the mouse, fox and stoat see
Their old homes should be cherished.
Who needs fine houses?

The moral is not that it is wrong to live in fine houses, but that it is good to be thankful for what we have. As for gloating – perhaps pride comes before a fall.