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G is for Giver of Life

This April on Sue’s Trifles the theme is the names of God.  There may be more than one name for some of the letters.  There may be others I have omitted.  I hope that by going through the alphabet together we may learn more about the nature of God who is Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Letter G
Giver of Life is a name of God.  He gives life in the sense that all living things were made by him.  (My post for C is about God as Creator.)  He also gives spiritual or eternal life.  This is not something, which happens only after we die (as in life after death), but something, which begins in this life and continues after death.

God is used as a name.  Many prayers begin, “O God” or “O God, our heavenly Father” or “O God” followed by a description of who God is or what He has done.  Examples of these prayers may be found in the Book of Common Prayer or in more modern language in Common Worship.  They are known as collects and one is set for each Sunday and Holy Day in the Christian year.

Great is a word, which has become popular.  God is truly great.  A favourite hymn begins

Great is thy faithfulness, O God our Father,

Great is thy faithfulness

Great is thy faithfulness

I have mentioned this hymn in a post about a flower festival I was fortunate to be present at last summer.

In case you haven’t time to click I am posting the photo again with another showing details of God’s provision at harvest time.

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detail

Detail from Great is thy faithfulness

 

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A Flower Festival – Part 3

The Church of Christ the Healer at Burrswood dates from 1960.  It is the only Church of England church building dedicated to the healing ministry.

The Church of Christ the Healer

The Church of Christ the Healer

During our stay at Burrswood Mum and I attended a healing service.  There are services throughout the week mainly Holy Communion with twice weekly healing services.  The concert on the Friday evening was also held in the church.  We were fortunate to be able to watch it from the comfort of our room via a TV link.

Breakthrough Cross

Breakthrough Cross

The Church was already decorated for the flower festival when we went there.  There were arrangements everywhere – on every windowsill, in every corner, on the font, lectern and pulpit.

When we returned to look at the flowers we were able to take in the details.  In the entrance was a beautiful, bright arrangement.  It was hardly a surprise to discover the title – All things bright and beautiful.

All things bright and beautiful

All things bright and beautiful

The four windows depicting saints (or angels) had inspired beautiful arrangements with objects from the windows included.  The saints are (from back to front) St Raphael, St Uriel, St Gabriel and St Michael.  I did not take any photos of these due to the technical challenges of tall, light windows with floral arrangements below them.  (St Michael’s window is to the right of the pulpit below.)

The pulpit has carvings of a lion and of fruits.  At first I didn’t notice the decorations for the flower festival around its base.  They were of a darker shade than the pulpit and picked up the theme of the carving.  I really liked them, but my photo does not do them justice.

Fruits of the Earth and Shining Bright

Fruits of the Earth and Shining Bright

The Pascal candle beside the pulpit had the title Shining Bright.

There were twenty one named arrangements in the church building.  The lady attending to an arrangement entitled Reflection pointed out how she had included motifs from the light fittings – one of which is partly visible in the photo of the music corner.  It was beautiful and (like all the arrangements) inspired by the context.

 

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The Spoken word

The Spoken Word

 

The lectern was adorned with a relatively simple arrangement, The Spoken Word

As an amateur musician I was drawn towards the display around the piano –  Let there be music.

Let there be music

Let there be music

We also lifted up our eyes to admire the front of the balcony/organ loft where the arrangement was Lift Up Your Eyes.

 

A steward pointed out the changing colours (from dark to light) of the pew ends – Guiding Light.

Burrswood’s founder Dorothy Kerin pioneered “Whole person” care, looking after body, mind and spirit.  This is still a Guiding Light there.

An Arrangement

An Arrangement

I had great difficulty in taking the next photo as the bright sunlight on the screen of my tablet made it impossible to use it as a viewfinder.  This is my second attempt; almost all of the arrangement is in the frame!

 

Once again, congratulations to everyone involved in this exciting and inspiring event!

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A Flower Festival – Part 2

It was a happy coincidence that Mum and I were staying at Burrswood at the start of the flower festival.  Hubby had booked a place on a Jazz Summer School.  He suggested that Mum and I might have a holiday together at the same time.

As Mum had enjoyed previous stays at Burrswood, she suggested that we might go there for a few nights.  This was arranged and we had discovered prior to booking that we would be there to see the flower festival, which was a bonus.

In my previous post I described the number of floral arrangements in the festival.  The events included a preview and official opening on the Thursday, a concert in the church on the Friday and a Vintage Tea Party on Saturday (after we had left).  There was also a Watercolour Workshop on Friday and we saw the participants choosing their subjects and settling down to paint.

Love so amazing

Love so amazing

The prayer walk at Burrswood includes ten points where verses of well-known hymns are displayed.  There were appropriate arrangements at each point, but I did not take photos of every single one.
Love so amazing (from When I survey the wondrous cross) had two arrangements and I have both on digital media (not film these days!)  Mum enjoyed a long marriage to a keen photographer (Dad), so when she asked me, “How many can you take?” she may have meant, “How much longer will you be?”

The larger arrangement included red roses, carnations and love lies bleeding.

Love so amazing

Love so amazing

 

 

 

The Lord’s My Shepherd consisted of many elements.  I did not capture all of them.  Mum sat and waited for me on the bench nearby.

The Lord's my shepherd

The Lord’s my shepherd

 

 

Nothing Else to Fear was the phrase chosen from Through all the changing scenes of life.  Birth, marriage, death and resurrection were depicted.  Details included a stork and bootees, a bugle and daisies.  Pushing up daisies, perhaps.

Nothing more to fear

Nothing more to fear

 

Perfect Peace of God was the title at the point for Like a mighty river flowing.

Perfect peace of God

Perfect peace of God

 

Kindle a flame represented O thou who camest from above.

Kindle a flame

Kindle a flame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A grateful heart was a particularly unusual display on the lower lawn.  The shape had been interesting all week, but the sunflowers brought colour to it.  Two enormous bees fluttered in the breeze.

A grateful heart

A grateful heart

 

Great is thy faithfulness includes the lines

Summer and winter and springtime and harvest,
Sun moon and stars in their courses above

 

Great is thy faithfulness

Great is thy faithfulness

The lady working on this told me she still had to add the sun, moon and stars, so the first time I saw it complete, I had a really good look at all the parts.  There was even a butterfly.  I took more photos of this than of any of the others.

 

At another point by the pond, St Francis is remembered and the hymn is Be still for the presence of the Lord.  The phrase chosen was The Power of the Lord.  Again there were many constituent parts to this interpretation.  I did not find a spot where I could see them all.

Be still

Be still for the power of the Lord

 

One of my favourite hymns is What a friend we have in Jesus.  The line providing the inspiration was Take it to the Lord in prayer.  This was an interpretation, which I found particularly effective.  On a framework of bare wood, there was a pair of praying hands in two dimensions.  White lilies were rising up the framework as if they were prayers ascending to the throne of God.  At the base was a small decorative kneeler in white, with beads and a cross of variegated leaves.  I didn’t have an opportunity to catch it on camera.  Do photos make our memories lazy?

The arrangements in the church will have to wait for another day.