What I read in May 2017

I read five books in May 2017. One has been discussed at length already. Please excuse the white space in this post and scroll down to find out about the other four books. I am aiming to spend less time blogging in future. Formatting a post takes time I could spend away from my computer!

The Fiddler’s Leg by Ann Lingard

The Fiddler’s Leg
The task set for the Writing group I belong to was to read a book by a Cumbrian author. I found this book by a resident of the county in a second-hand book sale. It didn’t really count as she had written it before moving/relocating to Cumbria! I enjoyed it all the same especially as there is an overlap in the interests of the characters between science and the arts.

Tarka the Otter by Henry Williamson has had a post all to itself.

The Land of Green Ginger by Winifred Holtby was another book I found among the second-hand books. The title reminded me of a children’s book by Noel Langley, but this is very different. The setting is around the time of the World War I and the characters are interesting and credible. Some of the events are traumatic, but the ending is hopeful.

Tails I lose by Justyn Rees Larcombe is the true life story of a promising young man (the author) who became addicted to online gambling and lost everything. He had grown up in a Christian family, but drifted away from the Church and his faith. After successful careers in the army and then in civilian life, he found that his life was in tatters. The path to his recovery and how he now helps others with similar addictive behaviour is described in this fast-paced, readable book. I bought it in a  bookshop.

Stormbringers by Philippa Gregory is the second in a series. It is another second-hand book, this time a hardback with a good sized print and line drawings at the start of each chapter. I enjoyed reading it but found the ending rather dark. The series title should have prepared me though: Order of Darkness.

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The Jazz Files – Book review

That I bought this book last Friday morning, began reading it in the afternoon and finished it in the evening is a recommendation by itself.  The story is well constructed.  I spent the whole of one chapter wondering whether there was an error in what the film industry calls continuity, only to discover it was an important element in the plot.

I had put off reading the book as I was uncertain whether it was a crime novel or a historical novel.  The former is not a genre I enjoy now, but the latter is.  I am going to declare that this is a historical novel.  It is set in the 20th century and whether any crimes have been committed, well, why don’t you read it and find out?

I am still puzzled by one sentence, which has been transcribed from Russian.  It perhaps is not important to have the meaning, but having a passing acquaintance with the language, I’d have liked to have been able to work out what it meant.  I failed. Я не знаю.  I don’t know!

However I do know that I’ll be looking out for the next in the Poppy Denby series by Fiona Veitch Smith.

Weaving the threads

Fiction (not my usual genre)

“Look!  There’s a staircase behind this door.  Let’s explore!”

“It’s a bit dark.  I hope there aren’t any spiders.”

“Come on!  There’s a skylight; it’s better up here!

“I don’t think I’ve ever been in an attic before.”

“I wonder what’s in that chest.”

“Let’s see…”

“Whatever is that?”

The children had no idea what they had found.  There were two of them.  At one end there was smoothed wood and then some metal.  They took them down the stairs to ask their parents.

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Martha sat looking at the church records.  She could see several entries with the name she was looking for.  Where to begin?  How would she know that she had the correct family.  It was the most usual surname in that area.  Why did everyone call their son John?

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“Mum, what does that sign say? A-R-B-O-R-E-T-U-M.”

“Arboretum.  It’s a tree garden.  We’ll see lots of different sorts of trees.”

It was a family outing.  They did see many different species of tree, but they didn’t find a shoe tree or a family tree!

Today’s prompt is from 365 days of Writing Prompts:-

Weaving the threads

Draft a post with three parts, each unrelated to the other, but create a common thread between them by including the same item — an object, a symbol, a place — in each part.

Another blogger’s response to the same prompt.