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Love #AtoZChallenge

#AtoZChallenge 2021 April Blogging from A to Z Challenge letter L

This year for the Blogging from A to Z in April Challenge I have chosen a single word for each letter of the alphabet. Each of these words is important in the Bible. I am including a story in each post. Links from biblical references go to Bible Gateway.

A search of the Bible for the word love also counts loved, lovely and loves. From the NKJV there are 267 references in the Old Testament and 237 in the New Testament, which is much shorter. Love features strongly in the New Testament.

To jump to the story The disciple John tells of a memorable day click here.

Last year in the A to Z Challenge I suggested that the Easter story is the greatest story about love ever told. This year Easter day (Resurrection Day) was celebrated on Sunday 4 April in the west. It will be celebrated on Sunday 2 May by the Eastern Orthodox Christians.

The Bible includes stories about love within families, romantic love, God’s love and (in the New Testament) how love is acted out between believers.

Here are some links to passages about love in the New Testament:

Matthew 5:44-46

John 3:16, John 13:34-35, John 15:12-13

Romans 8:38-39, 1 Corinthians 13:4-13 1 John 4:7-21

The disciple John tells of a memorable day

It was quite unusual for the Master to take a few of us apart from the rest of the twelve disciples. On what started out as an ordinary day, with people coming to us to be healed, he called three of us to one side and led us up a mountain. There was Simon Peter and my brother James. We weren’t known as the quietest disciples, but that day we didn’t know what to say.

At the top of the mountain the Master began to look quite different from usual. His face shone and his clothes looked whiter than anything I have ever seen. It was as if light was coming from them. Then we saw Moses and Elijah talking with him.

Peter always had to say something.

‘Lord, it is good that we are here. Would you like me to build three shelters – one for you, one for Moses and one for Elijah?’

While he was speaking a bright cloud came and hid the Master, Moses and Elijah from our view. Then we heard a voice from the cloud.

‘This is my Son, whom I love and with whom I am pleased. Listen to him!’

We were terrified and fell to the ground. Then we felt his gentle hand as he told us to get up. ‘Don’t be afraid.’

The three of us were alone with Jesus on the mountain top.

As we came down from the mountain, he told us not to tell anyone what we had seen until after the Son of Man had been raised from the dead.

We were puzzled about many things. We asked him why the teachers of the law say that Elijah must come first. He replied that Elijah had already come, but not been recognised. He had been treated just as people wished and the same would happen to the son of Man.

We realised he was speaking about John the Baptiser, who had been killed. Later we linked what we had heard on the mountain to Jesus’ baptism by John, when there was also a voice from heaven.

We didn’t have more chance to talk as Jesus had to help the other disciples straight away; there was a difficult healing they had not managed on their own. We kept his secret until after he had died and been raised form the dead.

Moses received the Law whereas Elijah and John the Baptiser were prophets, so this was an endorsement of Jesus’ statement that he was fulfilling the Law and the prophets.


My retelling of this story of the transfiguration is based on Matthew 17: 1-23

Matthew 3:17 and Matthew 17:5 God speaks of Jesus as his son whom he loves.

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Metonymy paint chip poetry

Lynda Kruschke writes:

My challenge is to write a poem, of any style, in which one or more of the paint chip words and phrases is used as a metonymy. You could write rhyming couplets or crazy free verse or a beautiful sonnet.

The paint chip words and phrases at your disposal are gauzesagebrushlooking glassrabbit holequicksilverPlymouth Rock, and mountain town.


While I appreciate that the challenge is to use one or more of these words and phrases as a metonym – representing something else, I was not inspired to construct a poem in that way. (Metonymy is the use of metonyms.)

I noticed that rabbit hole and looking glass are connected with Lewis Carroll’s Alice, who had adventures in Wonderland (accessed via a rabbit hole) and through the looking-glass. Lewis Carroll’s real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. He was a mathematician with a sense of fun.

My poem is just for fun rather than a serious attempt at using the prompt. If you haven’t read Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking-glass, I thoroughly recommend them. I saw a film of Through the looking-glass, which did not bear much resemblance to the book!

Failed metonymy

A mathematician named Charles
Wrote fiction appealing to girls.
His books about Alice
Were read in the Palace,
But Alice did not have curls.

The young girl mentioned above
Had a dream – the poor love.
Down a rabbit hole
Went this young soul.
A dodo was there not a dove.

In the next book Charles wrote
Alice’s looking-glass he smote.
Through she went to a land,
Where adventures were planned.
A story was told – take note!


As this post is scheduled for Easter Sunday I wish all my readers a Happy Easter. You are warmly invited to check out the rest of my blog and especially my posts for the Blogging from A to Z in April Challenge, which has just begun. (My earlier posts may also be found using the << at the bottom of the post.)

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Z is for Zebedee’s family

My posts for the A to Z Challenge this year are all about the Easter Story, recorded in 4 books of the New Testament: the Gospels. Image in sidebar links to Theme Reveal post.

Image in sidebar or below post links to Theme reveal

Three members of Zebedee’s family are mentioned in the Easter story. One of them wrote a Gospel, telling the story as an eye-witness. (Letter G)

When Jesus chose his first twelve disciples four of them were fishermen. Matthew 4:18-22 There were two brothers, Andrew and Simon. Simon was later named Peter by Jesus (Letter P). The other two fishermen were brothers named James and John, the sons of Zebedee. John wrote the gospel with his name and two letters, which appear in the New Testament. There is some argument among scholars about whether he also wrote the final book in the Bible, the Revelation of St John the Divine. John was Jesus’ closest friend among his disciples. While Jesus was dying on the cross (Letter C and Letter D) he commended his mother to John’s care and John to his mother’s. John 19:25-27

The third person from Zebedee’s family, who played a part in the Easter story was Salome, the mother of James and John. She was one of the women, who went to the tomb on Resurrection Sunday to finish preparing the body for burial. (Letter A , Letter M and Letter R)

My Theme Reveal contains links to the Easter story in the New Testament.