A visit to The Lost Words exhibition

As the date for The Lost Words exhibition to close was approaching I realised that it would be possible to visit it in a single day travelling by train and bus. The internet is a wonderful tool for discovering and planning. I booked advance tickets including plusbus, collected them from a machine, set my alarm for an early start and off we went.

My research fell down a little over the location of bus stops, but we still managed to arrive at the Royal Botanic Garden in Edinburgh in the morning. There were other people travelling on the same bus to the gardens. Fortunately one of them knew the way!

Inverleith House

Inverleith House

Entry to the gardens is free, as for The Lost Words exhibition. We found Inverleith House with the help of maps in the gardens and arrived there at the same time as a group of primary school children. (The summer holidays start and end earlier in Scotland than in England for reasons connected with the Scottish potato harvest in earlier times.)

We followed the youngsters in and were impressed by their enthusiasm. However we chose a different route around the exhibition so that we could enjoy it more quietly! In fact we went round some of it twice.

The rooms were empty apart from the exhibition on the walls. Jackie Morris’s beautiful artwork was displayed alongside Robert Macfarlane’s acrostic poems. There were other items of interest, such as an enclosed nature table a bird’s nest and egg, another representing the artist’s workspace and yet another with the writer’s notebook showing his work in progress. Relevant items from the Royal Botanic Garden’s archive were also on display.

There were families and individuals visiting the exhibition. The artwork was presumably the originals from which the book was made. The paintings of the absences did not have the scattered letters across them, which are in the book. I didn’t realise the difference until the following day, when I was describing the exhibition to someone, who hadn’t heard about it. (Yes, there still are people, who have not heard of The Lost Words!)

The book is beautiful, but some of the paintings are interrupted by the fold between facing pages. It was lovely to see them as complete pictures in frames and to be able to admire them from a distance or have a closer look.

I am amazed that many of my friends and acquaintances do not seem to have heard of The Lost Words.

One who has, alerted me to other spin-offs from the dictionary, which replaced nature words with technical ones. Malcolm Guite wrote a sonnet. He also has a list of all the old words omitted from the dictionary in order to make room for modern ones.

Many but not all of the missing words are included in The Lost Words. My post about the book may be found here.

 

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The Blogging from A to Z Challenge Road Trip

Each year after the Blogging from A to Z in April Challenge there is a so-called Road Trip. This is for participants and supporters to visit more of the blogs, which took part in the challenge.

This year I have decided not to sign up for it.

In previous years I have signed up and failed to visit many more blogs than I followed during the challenge itself. This year the terms of signing up are particularly stringent. It is a commitment to visit all the other blog, with the possible exception of those with adult content.

Bloggers are invited to link their favourite post on their own blog from the challenge.

I have a few favourites on mine.

A is for Architect attempted to set the tone.

B is for Bank robber was a bit cheeky. I had in mind a couple of books I have read, which I didn’t include in the post: From Prison to Praise by Merlin Carothers and Jonathan Aitken’s book Pride and Perjury: An Autobiography. Both autobiographical books tell of how the writer’s time in prison led them to faith in Christ.

H is for Horticulturalist gave me the encouragement to continue writing, when I discovered that a name I had chosen was particularly appropriate to the subject matter. It is also the only post, which I illustrated with one of my photos.

X is for Xylophonist has a link to a Youtube video of a very talented musician, who happens to be deaf.

Z is for Zoologist mentions my concern for environmental issues.

If you wish to comment on any of my A to Z posts, my About page is still open to comments.

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What I read in September 2017

After a long spell of reading several books a month I have slowed down. There are various reasons for this. I have started knitting again. With the start of the autumn term there are more demands on my time – attending meetings, choir practices and other events.

Hubby and I have been listening to some audio-books together, gardening and going out for walks. It takes at least twice as long to listening to a book being read as it would take me to read it. As well as that I have taken a few non-fiction books off the shelves and begun to read them, but not made much progress as they require more concentration than most fiction. I have not given up on them completely!

One day I found a book I had not previously opened and read it from cover to cover. It was Whatever you think, think the opposite. Rather like the diary of Tom Riddell in the Harry Potter books I wonder whether this should have come into the possession of a young person. It consists of many photos and other illustrations and not a great deal of text. Written by Paul Arden, a former executive creative director at Saatchi and Saatchi, it encourages risk-taking and thinking outside the box. I only recommend it to people, who have already found their niche. Hide it from impressionable youngsters!