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What I read in September 2017

After a long spell of reading several books a month I have slowed down. There are various reasons for this. I have started knitting again. With the start of the autumn term there are more demands on my time – attending meetings, choir practices and other events.

Hubby and I have been listening to some audio-books together, gardening and going out for walks. It takes at least twice as long to listening to a book being read as it would take me to read it. As well as that I have taken a few non-fiction books off the shelves and begun to read them, but not made much progress as they require more concentration than most fiction. I have not given up on them completely!

One day I found a book I had not previously opened and read it from cover to cover. It was Whatever you think, think the opposite. Rather like the diary of Tom Riddell in the Harry Potter books I wonder whether this should have come into the possession of a young person. It consists of many photos and other illustrations and not a great deal of text. Written by Paul Arden, a former executive creative director at Saatchi and Saatchi, it encourages risk-taking and thinking outside the box. I only recommend it to people, who have already found their niche. Hide it from impressionable youngsters!

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What I read in May 2017

I read five books in May 2017. One has been discussed at length already. Please excuse the white space in this post and scroll down to find out about the other four books. I am aiming to spend less time blogging in future. Formatting a post takes time I could spend away from my computer!

The Fiddler’s Leg by Ann Lingard

The Fiddler’s Leg
The task set for the Writing group I belong to was to read a book by a Cumbrian author. I found this book by a resident of the county in a second-hand book sale. It didn’t really count as she had written it before moving/relocating to Cumbria! I enjoyed it all the same especially as there is an overlap in the interests of the characters between science and the arts.

Tarka the Otter by Henry Williamson has had a post all to itself.

The Land of Green Ginger by Winifred Holtby was another book I found among the second-hand books. The title reminded me of a children’s book by Noel Langley, but this is very different. The setting is around the time of the World War I and the characters are interesting and credible. Some of the events are traumatic, but the ending is hopeful.

Tails I lose by Justyn Rees Larcombe is the true life story of a promising young man (the author) who became addicted to online gambling and lost everything. He had grown up in a Christian family, but drifted away from the Church and his faith. After successful careers in the army and then in civilian life, he found that his life was in tatters. The path to his recovery and how he now helps others with similar addictive behaviour is described in this fast-paced, readable book. I bought it in a  bookshop.

Stormbringers by Philippa Gregory is the second in a series. It is another second-hand book, this time a hardback with a good sized print and line drawings at the start of each chapter. I enjoyed reading it but found the ending rather dark. The series title should have prepared me though: Order of Darkness.