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Rethinking my blogging aims

Back in May I was full of hope that I could post twice a week here on Sue’s Trifles.

Well, I managed to write six posts for Saturdays in addition to my regular Thursday posts. Then there were two weeks when the paint chip words and phrases from Giggling Fattie did not inspire me at all.

I began to question my motives for doing poetry challenges. A topic is set for an online poetry group I attend once a month. This requires or encourages me to write a new poem. Sometimes I already have a suitable one.

As if I hadn’t enough part-finished writing projects already, I have set myself the task of writing a series of poems on a local theme. The time and energy I might spend doing Paint chip poems would be better used for that project. Perhaps I am growing up as a writer if I can think of my own prompts!

It will soon be ten years since I began blogging. My blogging and writing milestones appear on my ‘What’s new’ pages here and on Sue’s considered trifles.

I am still learning all sorts of things about writing, blogging and poetry. After deleting 55 comments Akismet had identified as spam I turned off permission to comment on the page concerned. Now why hadn’t I thought of that sooner?

Blogging has widened my horizons and taught me lots of things I’d have missed otherwise.

As I mentioned in my previous post I have plans for the next two weeks on this blog.
That will take me beyond my blogiversary. About this time last year I wrote about coming out of lockdown and which activities I had resumed.

This year I am singing in the Church choir again and another choir I belong to has resumed rehearsals. The Ladies’ Bible study group meets when enough people are free and well. We are currently looking at Spiritual Gifts with a study guide by R. Paul Stevens in the Life Builder Study series from IVP. My voluntary work has taken more time recently.

Apart from travelling to the local writers’ group in May, I haven’t been more than a few miles from home since November. As a result mainly photo challenge posts are appearing on Sue’s words and pictures, which was not my original intention.

On Twitter I have not been consistent in my posts. I haven’t contributed much to #wildflowerhour recently due to illness and other demands on my time. There are other hashtags I like to follow and use occasionally, mainly relating to the countryside. As with my photography blog, travel would give more opportunities for photos to tweet.

As I am now in an environmental group at church, I have become more aware of the issues around posting needlessly on social media. The World Wide Web needs a lot of energy and storage space to keep it running. Posting large photo files or videos adds to environmental damage.

This blog is listed on Bible Gateway’s Blogger Grid. Not all my posts are faith-related. The hashtag #bgbg2 is for those which are. Re-evaluating my aims is something I do prayerfully.

Looking to the future I may not blog every week here on Sue’s Trifles. Some of my other projects need to be prioritised over blogging.

Thank you for reading. Watch this space!

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Book review: The Prisoner of Zenda and Rupert of Hentzau by Anthony Hope

Having responded to a question on social media about favourite literary villains that mine was Rupert of Hentzau, I happened to find a second hand copy of these two books. The Prisoner of Zenda is subtitled ‘Being the History of Three Months in the Life of an English Gentleman‘. Rupert of Hentzau is simply tagged ‘Being the Sequel’. They were first published in 1894 and 1898 respectively.

Photo of the book with crossed swords between the two titles.
Reader’s Digest edition of The Prisoner of Zenda and Rupert of Hetzau

I had read them as a youngster, meeting an anti-hero for the first time.  Meanwhile I had almost completely forgotten the stories, but found reading them as an adult a far less exciting experience. The language is dated, although the writing is very good. I noticed the assumption running through the books that the majority of characters were well-versed with Christian values and considered the morality of their decisions and resultant actions.

Set in a fictional European country (Ruritania) the stories are exciting at times and have some love interest. There are issues around loyalty, conspiracy and skulduggery. It would be a shame if these books were regarded as too old-fashioned to be of interest to a modern readership. They reflect the changes in people’s attitudes over time.

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Book Review The Captive’s Crown by Olusola Sophia Anyanwu

The Captive’s Crown: A story of inclusion, diversity and redemption by Olusola Sophia Anyanwu is biblical fiction. It contains some adult content.

The main protagonist is the woman who washed Jesus feet with her tears and dried them with her hair. There are many other characters (most of them fictional) from the time of Jesus’ ministry on earth. The story is told imaginatively in Sophia’s unique style.

Sophia (who is a member of the Association of Christian Writers as I am) asked me to read and review this book. She hoped it would be a blessing to me. It contains many quotations from the Bible and some interludes where we are given a glimpse of the activity of God and the angels in heaven. These are indeed a blessing. The story is gripping, with many lives changed through encounters with Jesus and his followers.

The Captive’s Crown is available from Amazon in paperback and Kindle editions.