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What I read in May 2019 (Part 1) Borderlands

The second of three books I received from IVP UK as a Twitter giveaway is Borderlands Navigating The Adventure Of Spiritual Growth by Mark Brickman. This is a scholarly book, which is very readable. It is particularly suitable for reading during this season between Easter and Pentecost. As well as drawing on the author’s own life experiences there is much about those of others, who have been involved in Christian revival in the past.

Although the beginning of Borderlands requires careful reading, towards the end I found that it was very exciting and easy to read. Most of the Bible references in the book are very well known. The reading I had heard in the service on the Third Sunday of Easter (John 21:1-19) was discussed in the part of the book I read the following day.

There are references to many books and online sources.

Borderlands is primarily about spiritual growth,but what I personally gained from this book is that I should continue praying for revival with more fervour.

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A to Z Reflections post 2019 #AtoZChallenge

#AtoZChallenge 2019 Tenth Anniversary Reflections badge

This year I was undecided about whether to take part in the A to Z Challenge. It is more difficult to find a different theme each year. With hubby’s encouragement I began preparing for the challenge at the beginning of March and had most of my posts ready by the beginning of April. All of them were scheduled before the middle of the month. I also scheduled Tweets – one for each post and some of my Facebook posts were also scheduled. I gained a few extra blog followers in April.

Early in the challenge I visited a few blogs, which were new to me and also blogs I was already following from previous A to Zs. Later I was too busy to keep up with any blogs on a regular basis.

I am including two lists of A to Z blogs I have visited this time.

List 1: Blogs I was not previously following:

https://shilpaagarg.com/

https://thequietwriter.com/

https://thesoundofonehandtyping.com/

https://looseendoftheredthread.wordpress.com

https://libbysommer.wordpress.com/

http://meinthemiddlewrites.com/

https://hortonious101.wordpress.com/

http://www.ladyinreadwrites.com

http://bestbookishblog.com/

https://trishafaye.wordpress.com

List 2: Blogs I have been following from previous years

http://jemimapett.com/blog/

https://scr4pl80.wordpress.com/

https://wordwacker.wordpress.com/

https://dustingthesoul.com/2019/04/

http://mainelywrite.blogspot.com/

https://atozchallenge.wordpress.com/

In one of the posts from the A to Z Challenge team a question was asked: which 10 people/bloggers have been most influential in your blogging career? My list is not exactly 10!

My daughter, who was a blogger before I was

Hubby, who has encouraged me

Paul Wilkinson and other bloggers I followed early on

Arlee Bird who founded the A to Z Challenge and has been an encourager every time I have taken part

UKBlogAwards for which two of my blogs were short-listed for the UK Blog Awards 2014

Rarasaur, whose challenges I took part in for a good while

The Daily Post from WordPress.com, which no longer issues daily challenges and photo challenges

The Association of Christian Writers, for which organisation I contribute a blog 7 times a year

Once again, I have enjoyed the challenge. However I didn’t feel that there was the same excitement about it that there has been in previous years. This was possibly because fewer bloggers signed up for the challenge. I won an ebook from Jemima Pett in a raffle she ran during the challenge, which I have yet to download. I am looking forward to reading it.

Many thanks to the Blogging from A to Z Challenge team, especially Arlee, John and Jeremy, whose badges I have used. Also to everyone, who has bothered to read my posts and like, rate or leave a comment. Perhaps now April is over some people might find the time to click on my links to Bible Gateway and read the passages I have selected. Comments are closed after 30 days, but it is still possible to comment on my pages including Blogging from A to Z 2019.

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What I read in April 2019 (Part 2) A New Day by Emma Scrivener

I received a parcel of three books from IVP (Intervarsity Press UK) before Easter as a Twitter giveaway. I decided to read A New Day first as I had heard of the author and her husband (Glen Scrivener). The book has the most attractive cover of the three! Moving On From Hunger, Anxiety, Control, Shame, Anger And Despair is the strap-line.

Emma Scrivener is a young mother, who has personal experience of anorexia nervosa. Her first book, A New Name, (which I haven’t read) was very well-received. A New Day is her second book. It is well-organised in sections named after parts of a 24-hour period, moving from partial darkness, through night into day. It is full of sensible, helpful advice about all kinds of mental health problems: eating disorders, panic attacks, self-harm, depression, anxiety, OCD, bipolar, SAD, schizophrenia and PTSD, perhaps resulting from abuse. It also addresses diagnosis and treatment.

Letters from sufferers are included as is advice on how to receive or offer help. When professional help is required and when/how the Church can help is discussed. The book is written from a Christian perspective and debunks the myth that Christians should not experience problems with their mental health.

I found this book particularly appropriate for the approach to Easter and finished reading it on Easter Day. The theme of moving from darkness into a new day or from an old way of life to a new one was timely. The explanations of why people’s problems take particular forms helped my understanding of some people I know. Having accessed mental health services myself in the past, I can vouch for the authenticity of this book.

There is a useful appendix with resources.

This is a book, which should be read by church leaders and those with safeguarding responsibilities as well as people affected by the mental illness of friends and family members. Recovering patients may also find it helpful. (I suggest that patients in crisis are not ready to read books of this kind.)