24

Sue’s A to Z Reflections 2022 #AtoZChallenge

This year in addition to completing the challenge on my own blog, I was privileged to have a post on the official Blogging from A to Z blog. Through the comments on my guest post I found some new blogs to visit.

I had written and scheduled my posts before the end of March. This might have left me with more time for visiting and commenting on blogs, but I had not allowed for some health issues and other time-management priorities. It is impossible to follow more than a handful of blogs during the challenge. I seem to remember that the first time I took part we were encouraged to follow five blogs near to us on the sign-up list.

In practice everyone will follow their own interests and find like-minded bloggers.

My thanks go to all those who have visited my blog, especially to the A to Z team. Special thanks to Anjela Curtis for the graphics and J Lenni Dorner for posting my guest post.

I’ll begin with the bloggers, whose posts I did not wish to miss. Apart from the official A to Z Challenge blog and its copy on WordPress I have three favourites.

The quiet writer prepares her posts with attention to detail. She is a seasoned A to Zer. Her previous challenges are worth reading if you missed them. This time she has written about British bridges.
Barbie is another veteran of A to Z. Her posts are interesting and she has links to many challenge participants, promoting visiting and commenting. (I still have to catch up with most of her posts.)
Lynne has done the challenge a few times, but missed the sign-up list this time. Her coloured quirky sketches show street scenes in Peterborough, England – a place I have not visited.

When I signed up to the A to Z Challenge his year I didn’t click the ‘look for new blogs’ check box. New blogs came looking for me!

New blogs to me

Janet Woods’ thoughts is a blog I intend to revisit.
Lady Lee Manila’s theme was poetic forms – some which were new to me.
More poetry from Imagery77, and from Monty at montysblahg.

I found it difficult to comment on this blog, but the owners were very supportive of my A to Z. Thank you Rishie and Bilbo.
Cheryl‘s personal blog.
Ronel writes about books.
A good story by a supportive blogger, Leslie, was too painful for me to read at the present time.

Genealogy is a recent hobby of mine, so I may catch up with Anne Young’s blog later.
A thought-provoking post from Barb Klein.
Unfortunately I cannot strain my eyes by trying to reading purple on black or I’d have spent more time reading a post about rockets from Regina.
Anne’s blog looks interesting but the text size is very small. (Almost ten years of blogging has not improved my eyesight!)
A blog with interesting photos belongs to Anne M Bray.
An interesting blog with good sized type from Betty, and a post from Tim Brannan I found interesting.

Gonzalo‘s blog about gaming
Andrew blogs about food.

Blogs I already followed or had visited previously

Three A to Z team members:
The Multicolored Diary has fascinating folklore stories based around gemstones from a member of the A to Z team. Csenge is the given name of the blogger posting as A Tarkabarka Hölgy on the official A to Z blog. Her full name is Zalka Csenge Virág.
Tossing it out is the blog of the founder of the challenge, Arlee Bird.
The sound of one hand typing is John Holton’s blog. He is the computer wizard, who set up the simulcast blog on WordPress.

Other bloggers I recognised from earlier A to Z Challenges

Thank you, Dave, for encouraging me to take part again this year. I’m glad I did!

Dean is a very supportive blogger with an A to Z about boxing.

I didn’t find time to follow all of Jamie‘s posts.
Poetry from Donna
A post I enjoyed from Trisha Faye.
Damyanti is a veteran A to Zer.
Anstice has a blog which I visited more than once.

Jazmin writes about her faith.

A blog with the theme women’s interest.
Astrid‘s blog.
A writing friend, Sophie Neville is a newcomer to A to Z, who approached the challenge in a novel way.
Janet’s smiles is the blog of a very creative blogger.

Church music played by Romi, which I hope to listen to later.
Amusing art from Cathy
History from Sara Zama, which I hope to read later.
Vidya writes about books

Excerpts from her book Deeply Shallow: The Tale of the Hostage Prince by Anna Tan

Thank you to all the bloggers, who have read, liked, commented on and shared my posts. I hope to catch up with some of the blogs in this post through the year, Perhaps I should sign up for the road trip, although in previous years I have failed to visit many A to Z posts after the challenge. By using links from this post I may have more success than from the whole sign-up list of 235 blogs!

If we interacted during the A to Z challenge and I have failed to mention your blog in this post, I apologise. Please remind me in the comments.

5

Zechariah #AtoZChallenge

This year my A to Z challenge is about Christmas, a major festival in the Christian Church. Another major festival is Easter, which I wrote about for the A to Z Challenge in 2020.

My A to Z challenge began with Advent and angels one of whom appeared to Zechariah. Zechariah became the father of John the Baptist, who prepared the way for Jesus’ (Yeshua’s) ministry.

This Zechariah is not the same one as the prophet, whose name is given to the penultimate book in the Old Testament. The prophet Zechariah foresaw events which occurred in Jesus’ life. Zechariah 9:9-10 is one example. It predicts the events of Palm Sunday.

The New Testament Zechariah also appeared in my post for the letter Q. I rewrote Zechariah’s story in my own words for my A to Z challenge in 2017. Why not click through to read it there?

A Christmas carol which uses the letter Z is the Zither carol. Zither was my post for my A to Z about musical instruments. The link above to the Zither carol is a karaoke version. To listen to the carol being sung, please click here.

While this year’s A to Z badges by Anjela Curtis honour the late Jeremy Hawkins, I hope that my posts about Christmas honour Jesus Christ, ‘who was and is and is to come’. Revelation 1:4

I hope you have enjoyed looking at the Christmas story with me.

4

Yule and Yeshua #AtoZChallenge

This year my A to Z challenge is about Christmas, a major festival in the Christian Church. Another major festival is Easter, which I wrote about for the A to Z Challenge in 2020.

In many countries in the northern hemisphere there has been a winter festival at the darkest season of the year. In pre-Christian Britain this was known as Yule. Christmas was introduced in December to use the midwinter festivities in a different way. The shortest day is December 21st. Christmas Day (as you probably know) is December 25th, when the birth of Jesus Christ is celebrated.

The Christmas season begins on 25th December and continues until Epiphany (6th January) or Candlemas (2nd February). Epiphany is when the visit of the wise men or magi is commemorated. Candlemas moves our thoughts to the presentation of Jesus in the temple. It would seem that the historical events happened in a different order from the Church’s calendar.

A traditional food at Christmas is a chocolate cake shaped like a log. The outside is covered with butter-cream icing textured like the bark of a tree. It may be decorated with the words, ‘Season’s greetings’ and perhaps a plastic robin (the European species, which is popular on Christmas cards). It is known as a Yule log and represents the large pieces of firewood, which would have been burned at the pre-Christian feast of Yule.

The carol for this post is the Gloucestershire Wassail, a song about drinking and making merry.

As I have mentioned in earlier A to Z challenges the name by which Jesus Christ was known during his life on earth was Yeshua. Jesus is the English form of the name. My earlier posts were Yeshua and You in 2020 and Yeshua in 2017.

While this year’s A to Z badges by Anjela Curtis honour the late Jeremy Hawkins, I hope that my posts about Christmas honour Jesus Christ, ‘who was and is and is to come’. Revelation 1:4