2

Paint chip Octave 2

Linda Kruschke’s challenge this week is for the next stanza in the October poem. Don’t forget to visit her blog for her poem and other participants’ poems and links.

The challenge this week is to write the second octave of your poem. The five paint chip words and phrases you have to work with are after the fire, shark, bramble, tickled pink, and bittersweet. I would like you to use at least two of these in your octave. You can use the same rhyme scheme as last week, or mix it up. But this week’s stanza should connect with last week’s.

Linda Kruschke

My poem from last week is here.

Octave 2

Like damaged nature we can recover
From setbacks and disappointments
Like being separated from a lover;
Some hurts aren’t soothed by ointments.
After the fire cliff-top gorse was black.
I noticed that bracken, bramble and grass
Were the first plants to grow back.
I look for changes each time I pass.

Greyish sea with white-topped waves at top, straw-coloured grass with blackened branches of gorse and new green shots of gorse, some green grass and brambles.
Blackened gorse in October 2021 from the fire in June 2018
0

September musings

The weather changed this week. Having enjoyed an Indian Summer earlier in the month, much-needed rain began to fall. This week is forecast to be showery with some heavy rain. Thunder and lightning keep featuring in the forecast for a few days ahead, but then disappearing nearer the time. Electrical storms are fairly uncommon where we live.

Last week our usual routine changed with visitors for 3 days. Enjoyable walks in the local area with them used up some of my regular writing time. After they had gone home I spent a lazy weekend reading a book a day as well as getting out in the fresh air for a walk and to attend a church service.

This week two mornings have been given up to gardening – one to visit a garden centre and the second to plant the pansies and violas purchased the day before.

A low water-level in a beck

The reservoirs in this county are very low at present. The rain will help to refill them. It was surprising how high the water-level in the nearest beck had risen after a day and night of heavy rain. Previously it was at the lowest level I can remember.

A higher water-level at the same spot

I have recently been reading a book on my phone using BorrowBox. I found it interesting, but there was rather more technical detail than I required as a non-medical person. After renewing it twice and accidentally losing my place by an over-enthusiastic session of cached data-clearing, I have decided not to finish it. Had it been a physical book I might have flicked through to see whether there was anything else of interest in it.

The book was The Changing Mind: A neuroscientist’s guide to ageing well by Daniel Levitin. I found much of the early part interesting especially the references to music – the author is a musician as well as a scientist. It is really too long to read on a phone, so I am abandoning it.

If you find the photos with this post interesting, you may also like Sue’s words and pictures, my blog with pictures in every post.

Thank you for dropping by. Normal service will be resumed soon!

0

Not quite rhyming – slanted paint chips

This week’s challenge from Linda Kruschke is from the letter S. The definition of slant rhyme is long, so why not pop over to her blog to find out all about it?

The paint chip words and phrases you have to work with are wheat fields, raven, moonstone, foggy harbor, and brown-paper package. In celebration of my 35th wedding anniversary, I would like you to use three of these five paint chips in your poem. They can be part of a slant rhyme or used elsewhere in the poem.

Linda Kruschke
From summer to autumn
It’s September – the wheat fields
Are stubble as the farmer counts the yield.
Nearby the early-morning foggy harbour
Lies on the route to work for the carpenter.
A raven has a favourite haunt.
It can fly, but I know I can’t!
Raven perched on a sea cliff with view of a bay and village in top left
The raven’s favourite haunt

Post updated with edits to the second verse. 5 September 2021