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New Year thoughts

I am putting off writing my next book review post until I have gathered my thoughts about how I intend to spend my time in 2021. So I am procrastinating already!

Many bloggers are looking back over the past year and forward to the next. It can be a useful exercise. On the More than Writers blog, to which I have been a regular contributor for a few years, there was a post about #myoneword.

I chose a word for 2016 and another for 2017. Since then I have not picked a word, but have aimed to use my time productively. (Is spending time on social media productive?)

This year I have been wondering about picking a word again. Listen was a contender. It occurs in the Bible hundreds of times, a good example being in Proverbs 1:5

I prefer Focus, which could include attentive listening and an element of mindfulness. I tend to be thinking about other things, when I am doing routine tasks. It is not particularly healthy. Sometimes it leads to not remembering what I have done or not done! I also have a bad habit of reading, writing or doing puzzles while the news is on the radio. I can knit (easy things) or colour pictures from a beautiful book (Images of Joy by Jacqui Grace) and listen at the same time.

In the hall of residence of my student days a small Christian Union group used to begin every meeting by singing the chorus, Turn your eyes upon Jesus. That is one way of focussing.

Looking back at how my life has changed over recent years is easier with my hand-written journal and my blog. Occasionally I notice that someone has viewed a blog post I had completely forgotten about. I read it myself and find that my life has moved on in some way from that point. For example, I used to update my journal every few days, trying to remember what had happened. Now I write about the previous day as part of my quiet time every morning. It is easier to remember from one day to the next. I had intended to make this more of a spiritual practice, but I find it very difficult to write my feelings down.

Perhaps that is something I should focus on. It isn’t that I am unable to do it, as I found out in a journaling workshop led by Tracy Williamson and Marilyn Baker on Zoom in September.

My regular readers will know that words fascinate me. My three words (2016, 2017 and 2021)  have a progression of shared letters – ReST – TRuST; TrUSt – FocUS.

Have you chosen a word to help keep you on track in 2021?

Whether or not, Happy New Year!

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Christmas Greetings!

This year has been difficult for everyone, but there is still hope. In John’s gospel 1:5 we read, The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.

I prepared a digital Christmas card before the UK government announced a tightening of restrictions over Christmas. Now people are only allowed to meet on one day, forcing any plans for extended visits to be cancelled.

Joy to the world, the Lord is come; let earth receive her King. Let every heart prepare a room. and Heav'n and Nature sing.

My card is a reminder that Christmas is still about the positive aspects of God’s gifts to us including Love, Joy and Peace.

Whatever your circumstances at this time, I pray that you will be blessed with a knowledge of the Giver of all good gifts.

The picture is one I have coloured from Images of Joy by Jacqui Grace, published by Just cards Direct.

(In 2013 I wrote a Christmas Eve prayer, which is still relevant today.)

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Harvest and Hallowe’en

The original version of this post appeared on More than Writers on 31st October 2016. I have updated it to include the differences in celebrating Harvest and Hallowe’en in 2020 with a pandemic compared with previous years.

The date of my original post is a controversial one in October.  Celebrations of Hallowe’en are regarded with anything ranging from acceptance to horror by different Churches and individual members of the Church.  Merchandise connected with Hallowe’en appears in shops before the start of the autumn term.  More and more families and businesses are putting up decorations.  Here in the UK it is not as prevalent as in the US, but is it growing.

By 31st October many churches will have celebrated a Harvest Festival or Harvest Thanksgiving.  There is no set date for this.  It is not a Red Letter Day.  By contrast Hallowe’en can be placed in the Church calendar.  It is the day before All Saints’ Day.

Celebrating and giving thanks for the Harvest is a long tradition.  In the lands where the Bible stories were lived out there were harvests of different crops at different times of year.  In the story of Ruth harvests of different crops (and their failure) form the backdrop.

I live in a village surrounded by farms; harvest is an important part of life.  It is hardly surprising that Harvest Festival is usually one of the best attended services.  In 2016 the Reader, who gave the address at our service, mentioned a crop, which may not be well-known in drier parts of the country.

The expression make hay, while the sun shines is all very well, but where the land is often soaked by the damp (very wet) weather from the Gulf Stream, hay has been replaced by silage as a fodder crop.  As I understand it silage is made from grass, which has not been dried out fully to make hay.  It is partly rotted by the time the animals eat it and has a distinctive rather sweet smell.  Before Harvest Festival, I had already decided that my photo for the original post would be of some novelty silage sacks at a farm.

When I was close enough to take my photo, I could also read the name of the supplier of the sacks.  Carrs Billington had been running a competition on Facebook and raising money for a charity for sick children – WellChild – through these novelty sacks.  (The previous year there were some pink sacks for a Breast Cancer charity.)

In 2020 our Harvest Festival was rather low-key. The church building was not decorated lavishly with flowers and fresh produce to distribute later to the very elderly and those in hospital or care homes. Instead there were donations of non-perishable items for the local foodbank. The service was attended by a few people, while others watched the live-stream or caught up later.

October has brought our thoughts to Harvest and God’s good gifts to us and to his creatures.  It will soon be Hallowe’en for which the UK government has issued guidelines. Do you expect any Trick or Treaters to call?  How would you treat them?  I know this is something I am not good at.  Some people might give them home-grown apples as an alternative to the sweets they expect.  Other options are specially produced leaflets with a Christian message and perhaps a puzzle. It is likely that children tell their friends which houses have welcomed them.

Personally I’d prefer October to be remembered for Harvest, but the majority of people are likely to think of Hallowe’en first.