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Two books I read during Lent

A friend gave me a copy of An Ocean of Grace by Tim Chester. This is a Lent book organised with an introduction followed by one reading for each day from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday. The subtitle is ‘A Journey to Easter with Great Voices from the Past’.

The readings have been collected and edited by Tim Chester, who provides an introduction to each. The theme is God’s great love for us. The readings are full of praise and the original writers’ understanding of what God has done for us. They included the work of many writers new to me and some I had heard of but not read before.

As I wasn’t well during Lent I only read through each day’s reading once. I hope to use this book again next year and spend more time on it.

Photo of the two books reviewed in this post

The other book I read had been on my TBR pile for some time. I bought Hallowed be Thy Names: The revelation of God through His names by David Wilkerson in the local Christian bookshop. The title attracted me. Perhaps I should have read it before writing my series of posts for the A to Z Challenge in 2015! I was interested to learn about some Hebrew names.

Hallowed be thy Names is one of a series of Christian classics from Rickfords Hill Publishing (RHP) available at the price of £1.00.

David Wilkerson’s purpose in writing the book was to share the names of God, which had been most help to him during difficult times. The book does not claim to be exhaustive in the names explained, but takes us through the Bible concentrating on people’s encounters with God. The aim is to help readers to gain heart knowledge of God. I found it very interesting and helpful, reading a chapter at a time as the author suggested.

I have begun to read it for a second time and intend to look up all the Bible references this time.

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Zechariah #AtoZChallenge

This year my A to Z challenge is about Christmas, a major festival in the Christian Church. Another major festival is Easter, which I wrote about for the A to Z Challenge in 2020.

My A to Z challenge began with Advent and angels one of whom appeared to Zechariah. Zechariah became the father of John the Baptist, who prepared the way for Jesus’ (Yeshua’s) ministry.

This Zechariah is not the same one as the prophet, whose name is given to the penultimate book in the Old Testament. The prophet Zechariah foresaw events which occurred in Jesus’ life. Zechariah 9:9-10 is one example. It predicts the events of Palm Sunday.

The New Testament Zechariah also appeared in my post for the letter Q. I rewrote Zechariah’s story in my own words for my A to Z challenge in 2017. Why not click through to read it there?

A Christmas carol which uses the letter Z is the Zither carol. Zither was my post for my A to Z about musical instruments. The link above to the Zither carol is a karaoke version. To listen to the carol being sung, please click here.

While this year’s A to Z badges by Anjela Curtis honour the late Jeremy Hawkins, I hope that my posts about Christmas honour Jesus Christ, ‘who was and is and is to come’. Revelation 1:4

I hope you have enjoyed looking at the Christmas story with me.

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Yule and Yeshua #AtoZChallenge

This year my A to Z challenge is about Christmas, a major festival in the Christian Church. Another major festival is Easter, which I wrote about for the A to Z Challenge in 2020.

In many countries in the northern hemisphere there has been a winter festival at the darkest season of the year. In pre-Christian Britain this was known as Yule. Christmas was introduced in December to use the midwinter festivities in a different way. The shortest day is December 21st. Christmas Day (as you probably know) is December 25th, when the birth of Jesus Christ is celebrated.

The Christmas season begins on 25th December and continues until Epiphany (6th January) or Candlemas (2nd February). Epiphany is when the visit of the wise men or magi is commemorated. Candlemas moves our thoughts to the presentation of Jesus in the temple. It would seem that the historical events happened in a different order from the Church’s calendar.

A traditional food at Christmas is a chocolate cake shaped like a log. The outside is covered with butter-cream icing textured like the bark of a tree. It may be decorated with the words, ‘Season’s greetings’ and perhaps a plastic robin (the European species, which is popular on Christmas cards). It is known as a Yule log and represents the large pieces of firewood, which would have been burned at the pre-Christian feast of Yule.

The carol for this post is the Gloucestershire Wassail, a song about drinking and making merry.

As I have mentioned in earlier A to Z challenges the name by which Jesus Christ was known during his life on earth was Yeshua. Jesus is the English form of the name. My earlier posts were Yeshua and You in 2020 and Yeshua in 2017.

While this year’s A to Z badges by Anjela Curtis honour the late Jeremy Hawkins, I hope that my posts about Christmas honour Jesus Christ, ‘who was and is and is to come’. Revelation 1:4