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A Knitting Project

I enjoy knitting and find it a good leisure activity. My recent knitting projects have mostly been charity knits. For those of you, who may have been wondering, I finally found homes for my baby knits and the twiddlemuff.

When I offered to knit a sweater for a member of my family, I hadn’t anticipated such a big project. However, I wasn’t going to refuse outright to create something similar to the suggested picture. A compromise was required.

A pattern I had used decades ago seemed suitable to adapt. The pattern was classic in style, but something more modern seemed to be required. Instead of a short 1×1 ribbed welt, I used longer 2×2 ribbing, which was echoed with a single layer neckline in 2×2 ribbing. The neckband was worked without a seam using a circular needle.

Instead of working the Aran pattern all over I restricted it to the front and back. After the matching ribbing on the sleeves, I worked the first row of the pattern and maintained an irregular rib throughout. The slip stitch pattern on the raglan seams was included to match the front and back.

The yarn was Hayfield Bonus Aran with 20% wool. The pattern was from The Aran Look by Patons No. 161.

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What I read in January 2018

I reached the end of just one book in January. For Christmas I received the story behind the film I wrote about in an earlier post. Jane Hawking’s book about her marriage to the physicist, Stephen Hawking (who developed motor neurone disease at an early age) runs to almost 500 pages in paperback. Travelling to Infinity includes childhood reminiscences, details of family life, where apparently insurmountable problems are dealt with, the connection between medieval Spanish poetry and early scientific discovery, trips abroad, relationships with friends, family and extended family as well as Stephen’s achievements.

Travelling to Infinity

Travelling to Infinity

I found the book very interesting. The author appears to be very unassuming, honest, resourceful and likeable. (A friend of mine lived near her years ago and liked her very much.)

It was interesting to see how the film-makers had taken true life events and presented them in a more condensed and sometimes spiced up way.

I thoroughly recommend this book to anyone, who can find the time to read it.

 

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#PsalmTweets: the last 16 tweets

This is my final post in the #PsalmTweets project, which began with Psalm 1 on Sunday 27 August and ended with Psalm 150 on Tuesday 23 January. (I say ended, but @PsalterMark is continuing hopefully with a new group of #PsalmTweeters.)

Rather than have two weeks of Tweets here and a final post with only two tweets and perhaps some thoughts about the challenge as a whole, I am doing the final round-up here. Scroll to the bottom of this post for my reflections on the project, if you are not interested in the Tweets!

Ps. 135: A psalm of praise to God for who He is, what He does and has done. A call to those, who are in awe of God to praise Him. #PsalmTweets

Ps. 136: A psalm of thanks to God for what He is, what He does and his love, Refrain: His love endures forever.

Ps. 137: An unhappy, homesick psalm from exile in Babylon – unable to sing and wishing for vengeance.

Ps. 138: David promises to praise God whole-heartedly. He desires that all the kings of the earth would do likewise. He reflects on God’s omniscience and love.

Ps. 139: A favourite psalm. David speaks of God’s knowledge of him/us, his presence, foreknowledge, protection, creation. David is honest and open before God

Ps. 140. David prays for deliverance from evil men. He asks God to avenge. He ends with a declaration of faith in a just God. The righteous will praise God and live in his presence.

Ps. 141: David prays about his relationship with God, that God would keep him from sinning by word or deed. He prays against evildoers, fixes his eyes on the sovereign Lord and asks for protection.

Ps. 142: David’s prayer when pusued by King Saul. He was hiding in a cave. Men were against him, but God was his refuge.

Ps. 143: An urgent prayer of David, pursued by an enemy, wishing to know God’s guidance and will, asking for rescue from trouble and for his enemies to be silenced.

Ps. 144: David praises God, who trains him for war. This is a difficult psalm in the context of “Love your enemies”. David sees deliverance by God as the key to prosperity and peace in the land.

Ps. 145: Headed “A psalm of praise. Of David” this one does what it says! 4 sections begin with statements about God’s character.

Ps. 146: A psalm of praise to God. Comparison between trusting in mortals and in the sovereign Lord of creation, salvation, healing, love and protection, who rules for ever.

Ps. 147: A psalm of praise to the God of Israel (thought to be exclusive) for his works in the life of the nation, creation, sustaining the earth. Poetry about the weather. Sing praises to God!

Israel is another name for Jacob. Christians believe that they are included as sons/daughters of the patriarchs as well as being children of God.

Ps. 148: “Praise the Lord, ye heavens adore him” is a hymn inspired by this psalm. Let all creation praise the creator.

Ps. 149: A song of praise to God, who is creator and King. Prayer about vengeance against other nations is difficult in the light of other scriptures.

Ps. 150: A wonderful psalm of praise to end with. Praise God in his sanctuary, for his acts of power. Use every sort of musical instrument, dance! All living things, praise the Lord!

Having the goal of Tweeting about each Psalm has helped me focus and analyse the construction. I have noticed details in some of the psalms, which I had glossed over previously. The differences between the outlook of the Psalmists and that of Jesus Christ struck me quite forcibly, especially in some of these later psalms included in this post.

I am taking a break from reading a Psalm a day and reading some of the New Testament on a regular basis, alongside the study materials I use. (Mentioned in my What I read in December post.)

The Psalms have much to teach us, but they have to be read in the context of the Bible as a whole. For example, Israel is another name for Jacob. Christians believe that they are included as sons/daughters of the patriarchs as well as being children of God. Psalm 147 uses Israel as the name of a nation.

I am thankful for the other Psalm Tweeters, who have encouraged me by likes or retweets and to my readers here.

Having accidentally discovered how to set up a poll on Twitter, I asked my followers there to vote on the subject of my future Tweets. A small majority of a small number of voters were in favour of tweets about the Gospel of Matthew. I am not qualified to exam-level in theology, but I ran the idea past the vicar, who encouraged me to go ahead with it. I am not setting myself daily targets as with the Psalm Tweets, which was a community project.