Paint chip similes

This week Linda Kruschke has picked simile from the Poetry dictionary. Don’t forget to visit her blog for the paint chip colours, her poem and the links to others. why not try your own poem.

Georgina Tennant gives advice to non-poets on how to write poetry. Her poem about bereavement is poignant though.

Your challenge, dear poets, is to write a poem using simile. Sounds easy, I know. But here’s the catch: for every simile in your poem, one of the paint chip words or phrases must be on one side of the linking word. That means the number of similes in your poem depends on how many of the paint chips you choose to color with. The paint chip words and phrases you have to choose from are bluebird, sweet ‘n’ sour, taxi, deep dark wood, vintage turquoise, ultraviolet, and sparkle.

I’m only requiring you to pick one, but as usual you can pick up some useless bonus points if you use them all. And a gold star if you can figure out how to put two of them on opposite sides of your simile linking word.

Linda Kruschke

I found this challenge difficult, perhaps because I was tired when I tried it.

Danger signs

Wasps, like London and New York taxis
Cut up and reassembled, nest
On the edge of the deep dark wood
As threatening as night sounds, which test
The nerves of anyone who could
Be old enough to have worn minis and maxis.

How do you read this? What is threatening?

If you are interested in wasps’ nests I have photos of some on my other blog, Sue’s words and pictures.

4 thoughts on “Paint chip similes

  1. Really interesting. I automatically thought of ‘Deep dark wood’ as the wood of an object, not a forest that animals and insects could nest in. I love how different people’s minds work in totally different ways.

    Liked by 1 person

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