Metonymy paint chip poetry

Lynda Kruschke writes:

My challenge is to write a poem, of any style, in which one or more of the paint chip words and phrases is used as a metonymy. You could write rhyming couplets or crazy free verse or a beautiful sonnet.

The paint chip words and phrases at your disposal are gauzesagebrushlooking glassrabbit holequicksilverPlymouth Rock, and mountain town.


While I appreciate that the challenge is to use one or more of these words and phrases as a metonym – representing something else, I was not inspired to construct a poem in that way. (Metonymy is the use of metonyms.)

I noticed that rabbit hole and looking glass are connected with Lewis Carroll’s Alice, who had adventures in Wonderland (accessed via a rabbit hole) and through the looking-glass. Lewis Carroll’s real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. He was a mathematician with a sense of fun.

My poem is just for fun rather than a serious attempt at using the prompt. If you haven’t read Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Alice Through the Looking-glass, I thoroughly recommend them. I saw a film of Through the looking-glass, which did not bear much resemblance to the book!

Failed metonymy

A mathematician named Charles
Wrote fiction appealing to girls.
His books about Alice
Were read in the Palace,
But Alice did not have curls.

The young girl mentioned above
Had a dream – the poor love.
Down a rabbit hole
Went this young soul.
A dodo was there not a dove.

In the next book Charles wrote
Alice’s looking-glass he smote.
Through she went to a land,
Where adventures were planned.
A story was told – take note!


As this post is scheduled for Easter Sunday I wish all my readers a Happy Easter. You are warmly invited to check out the rest of my blog and especially my posts for the Blogging from A to Z in April Challenge, which has just begun. (My earlier posts may also be found using the << at the bottom of the post.)

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