What I read in March 2019 (Part 2)

I have not yet finished reading all the books I received at Christmas. The book I am reviewing here is one gift I have read – The Ordnance Survey Puzzle Book: Pit your wits against Britain’s greatest map makers by Ordnance Survey and Dr Gareth Moore.

This is a fascinating book. There are puzzles based on 40 maps. I have attempted all of them and failed to score 100% on any! (I didn’t spend enough time checking and double-checking my answers in some cases. In others my general knowledge was not sufficiently general.) There is history, general knowledge, cryptic clues and obviously geography and map-reading. I looked at the first puzzle with the person, who had chosen it for this keen puzzler. It is possible for two people sitting side-by-side to see the maps. Some of the questions involving counting would make an interesting activity for a grandparent and a child of junior school age, for instance.

I found some of the maps particularly interesting as they are of places I have passed through. The Whipsnade Lion is a landmark I have spotted many times from Virgin Trains West Coast line. Because it intrigued me I found out about it online. I was delighted to see it on one of the maps. The background to each map is very interesting and a history of map-making and of trig points provided me with new information. (I enjoy learning new things.)

This is a book I shall revisit and perhaps introduce to other family members. The kind of questions set in the book could be the basis of family activities using maps they may already have. I remember being introduced to Ordnance Survey maps by my father. One of the things he taught me was how to fold them! Anyhow, I have been interested in maps and puzzles from childhood. A good choice!

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