#PsalmTweets weeks 18 and 19

The #PsalmTweets project continues. The final Psalm of my previous post really belongs with these as it is the first of 15 songs of ascents. A while ago I learned from New Daylight, a publication of the Bible Reading Fellowship, that the songs of ascents were used by pilgrims on their way to worship God in the temple at Jerusalem. Jerusalem is also known as Zion after the mountain it stands on.

Only a few of these Psalms are attributed to specific psalmists. One each by David and his son, Solomon.

These weeks included Christmas and New Year. I was economical in my Tweets and used these #psalmtweets to greet anyone, who happened to read them!

Ps. 121: A well-known psalm describing the help and protection God gives. #psalmtweets Happy Christmas!

Ps. 122: A beautiful psalm about Jerusalem – joyful anticipation of going to the house of the Lord. Pray for the peace of Jerusalem!

Ps. 123: In this 4th song of ascents the psalmist looks to God in heaven as his master. He asks for mercy because of proud and arrogant mockers.

Ps. 124: A song of ascents suggesting what might have happened without God’s help. Praise to the Lord, who made heaven and earth for salvation and help. (There but for the grace of God…)

Ps. 125: A song of ascents with images from the landscape around Jerusalem. some thoughts about good and evil. “Peace be upon Israel.”

Ps. 126: A song of ascents remembering God’s work in bringing exiles back to Zion. a prayer for restoration. Verses about weeping while sowing and harvesting with joy

Ps. 127:Solomon’s song of ascents is well-known. He was responsible for building the temple, but knew God’s help was needed. ‘Unless the Lord…’ Also children come from the Lord – a blessing #PsalmTweets @JustCardsDirect

Psalm 127

Psalm 127

Ps. 128: A song of ascents with promise of blessing. A bessing. ‘Peace be upon Israel’. #PsalmTweets Happy New Year!

Ps. 129: A song of ascents about persecution. The final verse makes more sense to me in the King James (Authorised Version) than in the NIV

(Originally I made a mistake here, thinking it was two verses, but it is just verse 8, which I found confusing. Counting is not my strong point! However I was preparing this post in advance, just in time to correct my scheduled Tweet.)

Neither do they which go by say,
The blessing of the Lord be upon you:
we bless you in the name of the Lord. (AV)

May those who pass by not say to them,
    ‘The blessing of the Lord be on you;
    we bless you in the name of the Lord.’ (NIV)

Ps. 130: A song of ascents which rises from he depths of guilt to the assurance of forgiveness and redemption.

Ps. 131: A song of ascents by David, humble and childlike, urging his people to put their trust in God – always.

Ps. 132. The longest of the songs of ascents. Looking back at David’s vow to find a place for the Lord and looking forward to his kingly descendant – Christ.

Ps. 133: A song of ascents about brothers living in unity, compared with the anointing with oil of Aaron the high priest and with dew on mount Zion, where God blesses with eternal life.

Ps. 134: a song of ascents of praise and blessing. I remember a chorus using the first 2 verses. The 3rd (last) verse requests a blessing from God the creator of heaven and earth.

 

There are many versions of the chorus available on Youtube. I remember a variation on the tune in this one. When tunes are passed on by hearing rather than from reading music all sorts of differences creep in. Here is one link.

The next post in this series will reach the end of the Book of Psalms.

 

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