Child’s knitted jacket

I was part way through a knitting project, when I received an email from Woman’s Weekly with advice about using vintage knitting patterns with modern yarns.

The yarns in old patterns are hardly ever available now.  I didn’t look at the link, because I am aware that it is fairly easy to find out about knitting yarns on the worldwide web.

When I planned my previous project, I was uncertain how many of the garments on the pattern I was going to knit.  There was a dress as well as the coat, bonnet and bootees.  In the event I knitted the coat, and two sizes of bonnet and bootees.  I had bought 500gm of yarn and had roughly half of it left over.

At this stage I had look at my patterns.  One, which I had saved from a Woman’s Weekly magazine about 30 years ago jumped out at me as an interesting and useful project.  I had used it before and the parents of the recipient(s) had been thrilled.  I weighed my yarn on the electronic kitchen scales and compared the fibre content with that of the yarn in the pattern.  It did not weigh quite as much as the recommended amount, but was 100% acrylic, whereas the yarn in the pattern contained some nylon.  I have an idea that nylon is denser than acrylic, so I decided I had a good chance of completing the smallest DK version.  The yarn came from a small independent shop in a nearby town.  They might have some left if I did not have enough.  Trying to finish it before they had sold all of it spurred me on to complete it quickly.

Knitted Jacket with Hood

Knitted Jacket with Hood

I managed to buy an open-ended zip in a small shop in a different town.  I might have preferred one two inches longer, but I bought the only suitable one they had.   It has perhaps turned out to be a good idea not to have the zip all the way to the bottom of the ribbing.  It gives more ease if a child is sitting down wearing the jacket.

I am tempted to show exactly how much yarn I had over.

The surplus yarn

The surplus yarn

 

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